Editor's Letter

Editor's Letter

Mea Culpa

I'm writing this column because I'm embarrassed.

Two recent issues of District Administration have carried columns by Gary Stager that have attacked aspects of the educational proposals/decisions of both presidential candidates.

As editor-in-chief, I feel that I erred in permitting publication of these two articles in the months before the presidential elections. The article in our August issue (Gary Stager on Kerry's Education Plan) makes an argument against merit pay for teachers. That's certainly a valid matter for discussion on our editorial pages. What does not belong are Stager's comments such as, "... the Kerry proposal could suggest either a generous desire to increase teacher pay or a cynical scheme to pander to the electorate." In another paragraph he paraphrases Seymour Sarason, "... members of both parties seem to increase in ignorance proportionate to their proximity to schooling decisions. After all, U.S. Sen. Ted Kennedy co-sponsored No Child Left Behind.

In our October issue (Gary Stager on Direct Instruction), Stager condemns a reading program called Reading Mastery and its inventor, Sigfried Engleman. The article contains some strong arguments against the "controversial pedagogical approach" (although it fails to discuss it's effectiveness or lack thereof.)

Unfortunately, Stager devotes most of his column to attacking President Bush: Unlike his wife, mother and Oval Office predecessors, this president had a more important agenda than demonstrating affection for children or for reading. The trip was part of a calculated campaign to sell No Child Left Behind. In what Michael Moore rightly observed as a photo opportunity, young children were used as props to advance the administration's radical attack on public education. He goes on, Engelmann's publisher is a textbook giant with ties to the Bush family dating back to the 1930s. ... The publishers have received honors from two Bush administrations and they in turn have bestowed awards on Secretary Rod Paige. The same company's former executive vice president is the new U.S. Ambassador to Iraq, and continues with phrases such as The War on Public Education, single-minded test-prep factories and magical voucher.

When Stager asks, "Has fear replaced joy in your classrooms? President Reagan might suggest we ask ourselves, "Is your school better off than it was four years ago?," he crosses the line between clever compendium and outright bias.

Stager writes a regular opinion column in District Administration. His opinions are his own. As long as he's writing about educational matters, I'm delighted to keep running his arguments but we will make every effort to avoid running material from him, or anyone else, questioning the motives of elected officials or candidates.

I take full responsibility for running these two columns. Stager has been a valuable contributor to DA for about five years. I took my eye off the ball.

As always, we at District Administration value the open exchange of ideas about improving public education. I invite you to share your thoughts with me.

Editor-in-Chief

jhanson@promediagrp.com


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