Articles: Assessment

6/11/2015
Renee A. Foose is superintendent of Howard County Public School System in Maryland.

Student engagement is directly linked to achievement. The higher the engagement, the more successful students are in their work.

5/18/2015
David Browne is superintendent of the Randolph, New Jersey public schools, a suburban K12 district of 4,800 students.

Student assessment in public education has taken on an unprecedented primacy during the 2014-15 school year, as states scramble to administer one of two new national assessments.

5/18/2015
Warren Berger's new books explores why questioning is neither taught nor rewarded in most schools.

As a writer, Warren Berger asks a lot of questions. It’s how he forms the ideas that he conveys in his work for a variety of publications, including Fast Company, Harvard Business Review and Wired.

5/15/2015
An ASCD survey found only a small number of people sensed a strong Common Core opt-out movement. (Click to enlarge_

Millions of students took Common Core tests this spring—and while it was business as usual in many districts, the spreading opt-out movement left some administrators caught between concerned parents and state requirements.

4/22/2015

Murky state policies leave administrators in the lurch as more parents opt their children out of Common Core testing, according to a March report from the Education Commission of the States.

4/8/2015

When 11 former Atlanta Public Schools educators were convicted in March of racketeering for altering student standardized test scores in a systemic cheating scandal uncovered six years ago, it left many shocked and others concerned about the tests themselves.

3/27/2015
A snake is the centerpiece of a lesson at the Conservatory Lab Charter School in Boston. It’s a program of Expeditionary Learning, a non-profit that partners with district public schools and charters providing innovative curriculum and teacher-created resources.

When four South Carolina districts joined forces in 2013 to compete for a federal Race to the Top grant, their shared educational vision was clear: Teaching students to be creative innovators and independent learners will improve school performance.

3/25/2015
Students at George Armstrong Elementary School in the Chicago Public Schools get lessons about money and finance. They learn about earning income and how to play a stock market game.

As today’s students find themselves deciding money matters long before adulthood, progressive districts are introducing financial literacy lessons in elementary and middle grades—with some requiring high school students to complete a personal finance program to graduate.

3/25/2015
Mark D. Benigni is the superintendent of Meriden Public Schools. Miguel A. Cardona is the district’s performance and evaluation specialist.

Meriden, Connecticut, is a struggling, former industrial city, once known for its silver manufacturing, lamp producers, military product development, and automotive component assembly plants.

3/23/2015
Predictive analytics is becoming more common in both public- and private-sector hiring.

Big data and analytics now offer districts some clues about which teacher candidates will be the most effective in the classroom.

2/18/2015

Arizona and North Dakota in January became the first two states requiring high school graduates to take a U.S. citizenship exam.

2/9/2015
Sharon Jacobs and Paulita Musgrave from Washington Montessori School in Greensboro, N.C. share the ASCD’s 2015 Legislative Agenda with Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC) during ASCD’s Leadership Institute for Legislative Advocacy in Washington, D.C.

Education advocacy group ASCD is calling for a two-year moratorium on using standardized test results for teacher or school evaluations.

1/22/2015

As debate over the Common Core continues to spread in major media outlets, local administrators must address parent and community concerns to keep the focus on student learning.

1/20/2015
New York Times science reporter Benedict Carey students can benefit from switching up where they do homework, or even changing the music they listen to while studying.

Benedict Carey was, by his own admission, not a good student. It wasn’t that he didn’t study. He did. But he didn’t retain enough of what he studied to do more than get by. If that sounds like a familiar scenario, then join the club.

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