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A new wave of e-textbooks is giving students more than just words and a few hotlinks on a digital page. Publishers over the last few years have been adding video, interactive maps and gamified quizzes designed to engage students more deeply in their learning.

The new breed of robots rolling, dancing and flying into classrooms is giving educators at all grade levels an engaging new tool to fire students’ enthusiasm for math, computer programming and other STEM-related subjects.

Students use ed-tech startup Edmodo to communicate with teachers and classmates through a closed social network.

Education technology-focused startups are experiencing their biggest boom ever, with 99 new companies raising over $500 million in the first quarter of 2014. This is up from just 20 companies that raised $64 million in 2009, according to startup activity database CrunchBase.

Creating educational materials has taken on a whole new meaning as more schools are bringing 3D printers into classrooms. Science, technology, art and engineering classes are using this new technology to build their own lab tools and to bring sculptures to life, among other projects.

Despite this innovation, districts still need traditional paper printers for everyday memos, marketing materials and letters.

The latest interactive projectors can turn any surface into an interactive whiteboard, allowing for greater collaboration between teachers and students.

Using accessories like digital pens, teachers and students can draw or write notes simultaneously on full-screen and side-by-side projections. Today’s interactive projectors can display 3D images and be connected to smartphones and tablets. All of these functions can help an educator create a more engaging learning experience.

There’s a lot going on inside a projector that can make a big difference in the quality of the images. 3LCD (liquid crystal display) and DLP (digital light processing) are technologies that power many of today’s popular models. 3LCD and DLP vary in the chips that use the projector’s light source, often a lamp, to reflect and display an image or video.

School administrators know they need to try to stop violence before it happens. Having the proper surveillance equipment can help district leaders keep a watchful eye over students and prevent the wrong people from entering a building.

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The editors of District Administration magazine are proud to present the 2013 Readers’ Choice Top 100 Products. This year’s winners were chosen from more than 1,800 unique nominations sent by K12 leaders who detailed the products’ positive impacts on their schools.

Administrators in the Los Angeles USD may tap the skills of students who hacked school-purchased iPads to strengthen security on the mobile devices. A week after the iPads were distributed in September, about 340 students hacked the security system to browse websites like Facebook and Twitter.

Kansas City Public Schools in Missouri lost accreditation in January 2012. As part of the effort to improve schools, district leaders asked MindMixer to create an engagement platform, the KCPS Forum. Parents can access the forum through a web browser or app on their phone and pitch ideas for improving the district.

When districts use WillowTree Apps, which designs engagement platforms, parents only have to use one login and get access to everything—school calendar, attendance, work—in one space.

New platforms are giving parents the chance to track their children’s progress without having to schedule a parent-teacher conference.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates between 1.6 and 3.8 million adolescent athletes experience brain injuries each year.

New helmet sensors are helping high school football coaches identify students at risk for concussion by recording the severity each time a player is hit in the head during a game.

A human-like robot that can mimic emotions and play interactive games can help students with autism develop social skills.

Aldebaran Robotics’ “ASK NAO” robot, which is about two feet tall, mimics an emotion with gestures and sounds, and waits for children to recognize the emotion. It may then ask children the last time they experienced such an emotion. It also can teach autistic children time, taking turns, basic conversation, and other communication skills.

Whether it’s lecturing in a large classroom, a play or concert in the auditorium, or a football game on the athletic field, the proper lighting and sound equipment throughout a school can make a difference. Having the right technology, such as speakers, microphones, and lights in these environments can make for clearer communication, increased engagement, and an overall enhanced learning experience for teachers, students, and the school community.  

Sielox LLC
Sielox Class Crisis Lockdown Alert Status System

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