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Readers spoke out in the largest numbers yet for District Administration’s 2011 Readers’ Choice Top 100 Products awards. The DA editorial staff spent days sifting through hundreds of submissions and learning about new and innovative education products nominated by readers. Nominations were accepted via the DA Web site from March through Sept. 15, 2011. Each nomination required a testimonial from a school administrator to allow us to understand how the product specifically impacted a school or district. Some products received more than 70 unique nominations.

According to a study on the 2011 Vision K-20 Initiative, the U.S. is not making progress toward educational technology benchmarks, particularly helping schools meet students' individual needs and providing authentic assessment tools. Source: Software and Information Industry Association

TCI K12 Social Studies Curriculum

Pricing varies by student count

According to a recent study, 43 percent of students feel unprepared to use technology in college and work life. SOURCE: e Education Development Center and Nellie Mae Education Foundation

Org chart

School administrators are faced with a wide variety of choices and a huge market when it comes to products and technology. According to a report issued in March by market research firm Compass Intelligence, school districts spend over $18 billion annually on IT-related purchases, and the market is projected to grow to nearly $21 billion by 2015.


Viewsonic MultiClient

$1,299 per server, $175 per adapter

Tracking More Data With Student Information Systems

Administrators shouldn't only look outside their districts for something new when researching possible products or technology to purchase; solutions can sometimes be found in unexpected places. "When we get a request to purchase something new, such as curriculum software, we do a thorough examination of what we already have to make sure we don't duplicate functionality," says Roderick Matthews, director of information technology in the Recovery School District in New Orleans.

81 percent of administrators said their districts were adequately teaching students about Internet safety, but just 51 percent of teachers said so. SOURCE: National Cyber Security Alliance and Microsoft





I like the name of Maine's 2002 pioneering one-to-one program, the Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI). It has the word "learning" in it, and that's exactly what it takes from many players to implement the approximately 3,000 one-to-one programs across the nation and to make them successful.

Netbooks were the subject of a lot of attention in education about two years ago; many saw these inexpensive, compact versions of laptops as the devices that would finally enable one-to-one computing to become commonplace in K12. Today, even though new devices have appeared—namely, tablets like the iPad—and taken much of the spotlight in the discussion, netbooks remain a viable and inexpensive option for creating a one-to-one program.

"Technology is not a magic bullet. If you have a computer but you don't have the content and you don't have teachers who know how to design good classes - it's not going to make a difference."

-President Obama, speaking at Bell Multicultural High School in Washington, D.C. on March 28.

A new survey from PBS and Grunwald Associates found that 97 percent of teachers said they used digital media in the classroom in 2010, and 78 percent used DVDs. However, 76 percent said they now downloaded or streamed content online, up from just 55 percent in 2007.



Digital Sketch

While most schools are under increasing pressure to improve the STEM education of their students, finding more effective—and cost-effective—ways to teach science concepts can be a challenging task. But as with many dilemmas in education, the right technology, when properly implemented, can be a big part of a successful strategy.

How times have changed! Eight years ago this month, products on this page included early software for online instruction, a guide for the Mac OS X Jaguar operating system—known today as Snow Leopard—and a pre-cloud computing file saving system.


Black Box


Educators learned about the latest trends and products on the market at the annual Florida Education Technology Conference (FETC), held in February in Orlando. Just as the Consumer Electronics Show proclaimed 2011 as the "Year of the Tablet PC," FETC indicated that this year will be known for the arrival of tablets designed for education.