You are here

Articles: STEM

High school students work to defend their computer network at this spring’s CyberPatriot cybersecurity competition in Washington, D.C.

CyberPatriot is all about protecting U.S. interests, and the heroes are teams of high school students. The bad guys (imaginary, in this case) are hackers who would try to disrupt power grids, banking, health care, transportation systems and other vital services.

Schools that can’t afford to compete with the private sector in hiring technology specialists are looking to other options, such as hiring part-time experts, bringing in volunteers or finding funds to retrain teachers.

Echo Meter Touch by Wildlife Acoustics
Heart and Lungs Lab App by Isygames
QBiC MS-1 Wide Angle Wearable Camera by Elmo
DataHub by Ward’s Science
Starter Electrochemistry Meters by OHAUS Corporation
Vernier Energy Sensor by Vernier
ChemAssist Mobile App by Fisher Scientific
MiScope by Zarbeco
STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning

Technology is revolutionizing the study of science in K12. New products for chemistry, biology and physics labs allow more engaging and, in some cases, safer experiments.

Following the BYOD and 1-to-1 trend, many of these products come with mobile apps so students can take their inquiries outside the classroom and analyze data instantly in the field.

Students work at a research reserve during an eight-day summer field experience developed by FloridaLearns STEM Scholars.
Summer STEM students also worked with teachers at a university research center.
Florida students get STEM instruction at a U.S. Air Force civil engineer center.

By 2018, Florida will have 411,000 STEM-related jobs, fourth highest among the 50 states, and nine out of 10 jobs created in the state before the end of the decade will be in STEM-related fields.

Students at Mount Hebron Middle School in Montclair, N.J., learned basic programming to make their Finch robots dance, draw, wrestle, race and play soccer. The Finch is the white device with the glowing nose.
Clay County schools students participate in a Lego robotics competition. A series of U.S. Department of Defense grants allowed the northern Florida district to establish an extensive robotics program that runs from elementary through high school.
RobotsLab's quadcopter can give students a real-life demonstration of a quadratic equation.
VEX Robotics is another kit students use for robotics competitions.
Southern Indiana Career & Technical Center's use robotic arms from Yaskawa Motoman to learn about advanced assembly lines.
Students use Pitsco’s Tetrix system to build and program robots for competition.

The new breed of robots rolling, dancing and flying into classrooms is giving educators at all grade levels an engaging new tool to fire students’ enthusiasm for math, computer programming and other STEM-related subjects.

Nationally, there are very few hands-on cadaver labs at the high school level.

An austere doctor’s office with three cadavers laid out on stainless-steel examination tables awaited students from seven Illinois high schools. Reminiscent of a scene from CSI, it was a lab where advanced biology students got a hands-on experience of medical science by dissecting human bodies.

Large expanses of glass provide a connection between indoor and outdoor learning areas and offer plenty of natural light throughout the Fairchild Wheeler Interdistrict Magnet Campus.
Fairchild Wheeler Interdistrict Magnet Campus has 10 wind turbines.
The 250,000 square-foot Fairchild Wheeler Interdistrict Magnet Campus will eventually enroll 1,500 students.
Flexible learning environments are configured for traditional instruction, group or individual study as the need arises.
 Group study areas feature work surfaces with storage underneath, offering more natural light and unobstructed views to the park site.
The student commons is the heart of the school, connecting its three learning communities. It is used for assembly, dining and group study.
The school was built on an abandoned park, where forgotten cars rusted. Today, the natural envioronment provides a rare rural escape for many of the urban students.

The largest school infrastructure project in Connecticut history is nearing its one-year anniversary. The Fairchild Wheeler Interdistrict Magnet Campus in Bridgeport, Conn., was completed last August for $126 million and is the state’s most environmentally friendly school.

An AT&T employee volunteer, above left, helps a student in the Boys & Girls Clubs navigate a creative obstacle course to help motivate youth to be ready for successful transition into the upcoming school year.

Some of the world’s most powerful companies are increasing their influence in K12 education by funding programs that blend workforce development with public service. Corporate initiatives range from retail giant Target’s $1 billion plan to fund literacy programs to IBM’s high school STEM programs that aim to prepare the workers the company needs to fill its ranks.

Sixth grade students at Quest to Learn in New York City play a game called Galactic Mappers in class.

Sixth grade students at Quest to Learn, a New York City public school, recently got a two-week break from regular class work to build a giant Rube Goldberg machine. The project, for example, required students to use physics and geometry skills to build a complex scheme of pulleys and tubes to accomplish the simple act of popping a balloon.

In the game Laser Meteors, students use a smartphone to shoot at the lasers on the ground, breaking them apart before they strike the player.
The STEAM Carnival was created by Two Bit Circus, a Los Angeles-based engineering and entertainment company that creates high-tech games.
Students will try to navigate at laser maze at the STEAM carnival.
In “a mash-up between Whack-A-Mole and Twister,” students recreate a pattern of lights on a wall by hitting buttons with different parts of their body.
The STEAM carnival will arrive in Los Angeles and San Francisco this spring.

A carnival with a twist is coming to the West coast this spring. Instead of eating cotton candy and riding Ferris wheels, students will navigate a laser maze and measure their strength in volts—all while learning engineering skills.

The STEAM Carnival was created by Two Bit Circus, a Los Angeles-based engineering and entertainment company that creates high-tech games for clients like Intel and the arcade restaurant Dave & Buster’s.

Linda Gojak, NCTM president, speaks at last year’s NCTM Annual Meeting & Exposition.

Giving math teachers the training and classroom tools to effectively implement the Common Core is the biggest challenge school districts face when it comes to improving achievement.

That’s why making teachers comfortable with the new standards will be a driving force in many of the sessions at this spring’s National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ (NCTM) conference.

David Evans, executive director of NSTA, leads a discussion with educators about the new science standards and what it will mean for districts.

A new approach to assessing students’ three-dimensional learning should soon give teachers a clearer picture of the reasoning their students are using to grasp key science concepts. This more intensive level of assessment will be a critical tool for schools implementing the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) that are designed to boost STEM scores.

Students in the app development class at Grover Cleveland High School in Queens, N.Y., met with hearing-impaired community members.

Students in a STEM pilot project at Grover Cleveland High School in Queens, N.Y., have developed a number of innovative mobile apps to help the hearing impaired.

Fifth-grader Cici Collins’ (second from the right) cancer survival story inspired a Common Core-aligned curriculum for her entire class last fall.

Upon entering middle school last fall, cancer survivor Cici Collins had no idea her story would inspire a new curriculum for her entire grade.

The Kent School District in Washington has more diversity in its student body, greater achievement and better technology, in major part due to Superintendent Edward Lee Vargas.

Every day, students whose families speak among 138 different languages learn together in the classrooms at Kent School District in Washington. To address the linguistic and economic challenges for the 27,000 K12 students—the majority of whom receive free or reduced price lunch—administrators have worked hard to build innovative language and technology programs.