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Articles: Budget

Presidio ISD, a remote, Title I, poverty-stricken Texas border district with a 98 percent Hispanic population, didn’t let limited financial resources block its goal of cultivating college-going ambitions among its nearly 1,400 students.

By leveraging a University of Texas partnership and creating a technology-infused community initiative, Superintendent Dennis McEntire and the district offered students remote access to learning opportunities over 200 miles away.

Tim Markley is superintendent at New Hanover County Schools in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Our growing district faced numerous facility challenges in the fall of 2013. The only way to address these needs was with a $160 million school bond—the largest in our district’s history. What made this campaign different for us was the extensive use of social media and a very coordinated information campaign.

A northeastern Tennessee school district has more than doubled the daily salary of highly qualified substitute teachers to entice them to teach in low-income schools or those that are struggling academically.

A regular Knox County Public Schools sub is paid $68 per day, but an already certified teacher or district retiree can now earn up to $164.

Digital advertising in K12 schools is an avenue for districts to make extra money. But some parents and researchers say that ads do not belong in school hallways.

Students in two Arizona districts will soon share the hallways with digital screens that display promotions for local and national vendors. This technological incursion is furthering a national debate over whether this kind of marketing is appropriate for students.

LAUSD Superintendent Ramon Cortines says district can't afford iPads for every student.

Los Angeles USD students will not receive iPads, after all.

In February, LAUSD Superintendent Ramon Cortines told reporters that he does not believe the district has the funds to pay for technology for every student.

The complex was designed to maximize natural light through large windows and skylights.
A media center can be broken down into four to eight separate learning spaces for small or large groups, and can be converted from a classroom during the day to a presentation and community hub for up to 300 people at night.
Classrooms were designed to easily allow students to work with technology or in groups.
Hallways are wide and bright, and some include semicircular spaces built into the wall where students can work on small group projects.
All furniture was chosen based on its ability to be moved and used for different purposes.

Princeton City Schools in the Cincinnati, Ohio, area has the fifth-largest complex in the state, a 555,000-square-foot education center housing a middle school, high school and community center that will be complete this year.

The superintendent and school board created a plan in 2009 to secure funding for the unprecedented project in the district. The $130 million construction cost was paid for through a bond levy, government programs and Ohio’s HB 264 Energy Conservation Program.

Funding for preschools increased 12 percent in the 2014-15 school year.

For the third year in a row, policymakers are making significant investments in state-funded preschool programs. Nationwide, state funding for preschool increased by $672 million this year, to a total of $6.3 billion.

Jasper County Public Schools was one of 36 rural, high-poverty districts to file a lawsuit against South Carolina, claiming that the state’s funding formula was unconstitutional.

After more than two decades, rural schools in South Carolina are tasting a sweet historic victory.

The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled in November that the state funding formula denies many poor, rural students their right to an adequate education—21 years after several districts first filed the lawsuit.

Grand View Elementary School in California’s Manhattan Beach USD has cut its trash from 30 bags a day to two, reducing the number of garbage pickups and saving $4,700 a year.

One student generates about five pounds of waste in 180 days from simply drinking a carton of milk each day of the school year, according to the Carton Council, a national industry-sponsored recycling organization. Add in glue bottles, old test papers and leftover lunch, and it’s no wonder schools are looking for ways to reduce both the amount of waste filling trash bins and the money spent to have it hauled away.

Three quarters of respondents to a DA survey said funding for their district would increase or stay the same in 2015. (Click to enlarge graphic)

Navigating turbulent waters of uncertain budgets, district leaders have a great challenge: Answer the growing push for accountability and heightened community expectations in 2015.

Paula Love, the “Funding Doctor,” brings decades of experience to developing grant strategies for state and local educational agencies, schools and institutions.

Are you ready for another year of doing more with less?

This year, let’s flip this funding challenge into an approach that enables your school district to get a share of the shrinking financial resources. A key approach to winning grants is collaboration.

Why collaborate?

Collaboration is not new. We talk about it, we provide workshops on it and we practice it in our schools and classrooms.

Tigerton School District in Wisconsin has only 250 students, and has faced $800,000 in budget cuts over the past three years.

Funding cuts since the recession have drained the accounts of rural districts, which cannot rely on a resurgence in property tax revenues as heavily as urban school systems can.

Some board members of Pasco County Schools discuss their policy revisions From left to right: Kevin Shibley, executive director for administration; Cynthia Armstrong, member; Alison Crumbley, chairwoman; and Joanne Hurley, member.

Some school employees face getting the short end of the stick as district leaders work to comply with new Affordable Care Act requirements while juggling tight budgets.

School staff sending out mail nowadays can save a lot of work with electronic mailcenters.

District mail rooms used to be hectic. Thousands of pieces of mail would cycle in and out every month, and all of it had to be processed by hand. But these days, life is much easier for office administrators who, still, must sort through the pieces of mail.

Paula Love, the “Funding Doctor,” brings decades of experience to developing grant strategies for state and local educational agencies, schools and institutions.

Student achievement, teacher quality, school safety, 21st century teaching and learning—these are but a glimpse into the areas of need each administrator must consider when making school spending decisions. Add to each of these spending decisions the impact of student productivity, and your efficiency and financial anxiety might increase.