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Reaping the Benefits of "Intelligent Classrooms"

In June, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in the cases Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1 and Meredith v. Jefferson County Board of Education that race may not be used as a criterion for desegregating schools. Experts fear that the decisions will make long-established busing programs, magnet schools, charter schools and other initiatives aimed at increasing student diversity and educational opportunity unconstitutional.

Dr. Beverly L. Hall's goal when she became the superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools in 1999 was to transform the struggling K12 school system into one of the nation's leading urban districts. Hall targeted the youngest students first, implementing a standards-based curriculum at the elementary school level. In 2003, 75 percent of fourth-graders met or exceeded the state standard for reading, and 67 percent met or exceeded the state standard for math, up from 47 percent and 43 percent respectively in 2000.

Today's youth often search for videos based on their interests on Web sites such as YouTube. They communicate with friends through instant and text messaging. Such technology has changed how young people learn, according to Martin McGuire, the Chicago Public School District's digital media systems team lead.

Which of the following statements about gifted education are true? (1) The term gifted means various things to various people. (2) K12 teachers generally express negative attitudes toward gifted students. (3) Among the high school dropouts in your district, some are likely to be gifted. (4) Students with learning disabilities can also be gifted. (5) White and Asian students are overrepresented in gifted programs.

After teaching high school biology for 13 years and being a principal in districts in and around Rochester, N.Y., a life change in 1993 moved Raymond J. Fashano from the comfort of a school to the thrill of the sales team of Dynacom, a company that helped clients implement technology into their business.

A year ago when the Cherry Creek School District in Colorado was considering ways to fund a GPS tracking system so dispatchers would know the location of buses, officials asked, Why not use the buses themselves to generate the needed cash?

When kindergarten students in Cincinnati-area schools were tested on their basic reading skills last fall, examiners found that 13.5 percent of the children needed intensive instructional support in phoneme segmentation fluency-dividing the different sounds, or phonemes, of a word. When tested at the end of kindergarten, only 2.7 percent of the children still needed that help.

The EduCOMM 2007 conference, held June 19-21 in Anaheim, Calif., provided outstanding opportunities for educators from school districts and higher education institutions across the world to come together to share best practices and learn more about what the digital future holds for students and educators. While the presentations in the K12 education strand were diverse, several common themes emerged.