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From DA

Uncovering the Fountain of Youth

The Quest Network is planning a trip for fourth- to eigth- grade teachers and students. The virtual trip to a cluster of Central American villages where inhabitants live some of the longest, healthiest lives on the planet is scheduled for January 2007.

I continue to be astounded at the resiliency of school districts throughout the U.S., as they strive to increase access to technology for students and teachers in the face of tight budgets. Nearly every day I encounter yet another district initiating or expanding computer access, such as through one-to-one initiatives. But with the current student/computer ratio in the U.S. hovering around 4:1, at any given time 75 percent of our students still lack access to computers.

Sometimes known as the Puritan City, Boston had the sweet feeling of victory recently after staying patient because, after all, it is a virtue.

Approaching the fifth anniversary of its enactment and up for congressional reauthorization next year, the No Child Left Behind act continues to be a favorite punching bag for many of the country's largest educational organizations.

All claim to have no problems with NCLB's intention, but beyond that they tear it apart, arguing that it isn't as effective as it should be in part because of inadequate funding and unrealistic or unworkable requirements.

Most educational groups suggest improvements, usually focused on their own particular interests.

Talk about a silly idea. Or is it?

What if every student in a district had an Individual Education Plan, the document that guides each special education student's years in school. What if there was something-call it an Individual Academic Plan-that outlined in detail what each student knows, how he or she learns, the student's goals and what the school will do to help him or her achieve those goals? What if public education was that personalized for everyone?

Math Gets Book Of Clarity

Math can be confusing for many people. It's not uncommon for math content and instruction to baffle elementary teachers, typically generalists without math degrees.

Eighth-Grade Science Around the Globe

The National Center for Education Statistics recently released results from its 1999 video study of eigth-grade science lessons, Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. The report analyzes and compares U.S. instruction to the approaches used in four high-achieving countries: Australia, Japan, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic. The goal is to help educators identify factors that could enhance student learning and achievement.

Digital Leader

Some people might think there's something in the water in Pueblo, Colorado, but it's really in the computers.