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Faced with mounting pressure to improve standardized test scores, school districts across the country are seeking ways to focus intervention efforts on students who have the greatest risk of performing poorly on those high stakes tests. The challenge is how to reliably identify those students.

As the new construction consultant for Jessamine County Schools in Nicholasville, Ky., Pete Royse spent most workdays managing thousands of details involving the building of the Jessamine Career & Technology Center (JCTC), which was scheduled to open in Aug. 2006.

Why write a book about homework?

In 2003 when Pam Sloan was principal at Francis Howell High School in St. Charles, Mo., she began exploring different ways administrators and teachers could be more effective at delivering quality education.

A professional convention is a bustling biological community in which each individual plays a highly specialized role. Among the various species are predators, scavengers and, alas, prey. The following is an introductory guide to the major birds that one is sure to encounter at a first convention or a fiftieth.

Games Students Play

Panel Discussion Spurs Action In the Business Ranks

Members of the Business Roundtable have taken the message that Congress intends to reauthorize the No Child Left Behind legislation as a heads-up call to action.

I continue to be astounded at the resiliency of school districts throughout the U.S., as they strive to increase access to technology for students and teachers in the face of tight budgets. Nearly every day I encounter yet another district initiating or expanding computer access, such as through one-to-one initiatives. But with the current student/computer ratio in the U.S. hovering around 4:1, at any given time 75 percent of our students still lack access to computers.

Sometimes known as the Puritan City, Boston had the sweet feeling of victory recently after staying patient because, after all, it is a virtue.

Approaching the fifth anniversary of its enactment and up for congressional reauthorization next year, the No Child Left Behind act continues to be a favorite punching bag for many of the country's largest educational organizations.

All claim to have no problems with NCLB's intention, but beyond that they tear it apart, arguing that it isn't as effective as it should be in part because of inadequate funding and unrealistic or unworkable requirements.

Most educational groups suggest improvements, usually focused on their own particular interests.

Talk about a silly idea. Or is it?

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