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From DA

Nearly 50 years ago, the U.S. faced a hot scare in the cold war. The Soviet Union launched in 1957 the first satellite, Sputnik, into space, sending the U.S. into a tizzy of fear. So the government poured billions of dollars into the space program as well as better math and science programs in American schools.

Now, the nation's schools are facing an economic scare in part due to countries like China and India taking on more American jobs.

Teachers at Oakwood Elementary School in Lakewood, Wash., outside of Seattle, watched TV at their first staff meeting last fall, and the dial was turned to the local news.

Another year, another budget, another fight. Educators are saying, and congressmen are agreeing, that the federal education budget proposal of $54.4 billion for 2007 is just not good enough.

Buying a laptop computer for every student: About $1,000

Hiring a consultant to teach teachers how to use laptops in lessons:

Roughly $1,500/day

Watching students use technology to draw conclusions something they wouldn't

normally be able to do:

Priceless

Innovative Program Gets Students Reading

Apple

iMac

www.apple.com, Hardware, $1,299

Few topics strike terror in the hearts of K-12 school administrators like the evolution v. intelligent design debate and with good reason.

Florida's Anti-Voucher Ruling Challenged

A voucher school advocacy group is looking to change the Florida state's uniformity clause so it would allow for public funds to go toward voucher school programs in the Sunshine state.

03/2006

What can districts do to ensure that professional development strategies and spending align with findings from the best available research and affect student achievement? Three 2005 reports address these questions.

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