You are here

From DA

Her child's asthma used to dictate Tonya Randolph's schedule. When Nikea, now in middle school, was younger, Randolph or her husband would be called away from work every few weeks to bring their daughter to the doctor for an emergency nebulizer treatment. The parents lost work hours and Nikea missed class.

While some studies suggest students want more connection between lessons and technology in the classroom, and that many teachers often struggle to accomplish this, the following books can help educators relate technology to students and improve achievement.


Mac OS X version 10.4 "Tiger", Software, Single-user education license $69, Server version $249

For most education watchers, Connecticut's recent foray into the fight over No Child Left Behind began the moment state Commissioner of Education Betty J. Sternberg sent a letter to Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. That letter asked, in part, that Connecticut receive a waiver to avoid the law's required annual tests.

Sitting in his one-story office in the town of Brandon, nestled among the Green Mountains of Vermont, William Mathis stares out his rain-splattered window as he contemplates education in the nation and his district, a few miles north of Rutland.

Quick--think special education. The typical district leader groans at high costs, paperwork and inefficiency. The assessment is frighteningly accurate, but a few districts are bucking the status quo by embracing technology.

When parents come to hear Ruth Parker of Mathematics Education Collaborative speak on quality mathematics education, they're expecting some answers. But what they may well get is a heavy dose of confusion and frustration.


Ed Leaders Talk Tech

Unless every student is given his or her own computer in school, districts can't even be close to transforming education, according to one expert.

Problem: It sounds like a Nancy Drew novel: The Case of the Missing Books. Except, for the Lee County School District in Fort Myers, Fla., the problem was all too real. During a standard review of costs by the governor's task force, a process that analyzes possible cost savings and procedure improvements in Florida's schools, a startling discovery was made about textbook losses. The task force estimated that from 1997 to 2002, the school system had lost 62,272 books, representing approximately $2 million.

While reports of rising childhood obesity rates have prompted schools to examine what gets served in the cafeteria and in school vending machines, interest in student health has not yet sparked a revolution in what gets served in the classroom. Health education is not identified as a core subject in the No Child Left Behind act; neither does the legislation call for highly qualified health teachers. Only 16 percent of states require student testing on health education topics.


Adobe Acrobat 7.0 Professional, Software, $449