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From DA

When students in Livonia, Mich., were prompted by a local radio station to visit a unique Web site with the name of their school district in the address, they were assaulted by adult-oriented content touting "75 live cams, 12 girls and no rules."

New Titles Teach Healthy Eating

Life must march on. School districts across the country have opened their doors to many of the nearly 240,000 children in K-12 that have been displaced and uprooted from their homes and neighborhood schools after Hurricane Katrina obliterated or drowned everything they knew along the Gulf of Mexico coastline.

Long bus rides. Teacher shortages. Poverty. Isolation and consolidation. Rural school districts in the most remote parts of the country all face similar troubles. But students in some rural states manage to do well, while in others, they struggle. Why?

If EduComm '05 was any indication, there's an audio/visual revolution occurring in our schools. The EduComm conference, held in June in conjunction with InfoComm, provided ample evidence of the convergence of information technology and audiovisual technology in K-12 districts nationwide.

Sherlock Holmes would develop a migraine deciphering this one:

Clifton Hill Elementary teacher Rebecca Harper remembers what the school was like before Jesse B. Register became Hamilton County's superintendent: unkempt buildings with no inside doors, carpeting likely laid the year Harper was born, asbestos, and a pervasive feeling of neglect.

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