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From DA

Generally, the more frequently students change schools for reasons other than grade promotion, the more likely they are to have lower achievement and behavioral problems. They are also more likely to drop out. Research confirms this. So, if we could just convince families to stop moving around so much, we could increase student achievement, right?

First I saw the smoke, then the fire. In the alley stood a half dozen teens pitching books, notes and papers into a flaming trash can. I approached the group with the worry of a former principal to investigate.

While some studies suggest students want more connection between lessons and technology in the classroom, and that many teachers often struggle to accomplish this, the following books can help educators relate technology to students and improve achievement.

Apple

Mac OS X version 10.4 "Tiger"

www.apple.com, Software, Single-user education license $69, Server version $249

For most education watchers, Connecticut's recent foray into the fight over No Child Left Behind began the moment state Commissioner of Education Betty J. Sternberg sent a letter to Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. That letter asked, in part, that Connecticut receive a waiver to avoid the law's required annual tests.

Sitting in his one-story office in the town of Brandon, nestled among the Green Mountains of Vermont, William Mathis stares out his rain-splattered window as he contemplates education in the nation and his district, a few miles north of Rutland.

Quick--think special education. The typical district leader groans at high costs, paperwork and inefficiency. The assessment is frighteningly accurate, but a few districts are bucking the status quo by embracing technology.

When parents come to hear Ruth Parker of Mathematics Education Collaborative speak on quality mathematics education, they're expecting some answers. But what they may well get is a heavy dose of confusion and frustration.

Monte Vista Elementary students are running in class. And jumping. And stretching. Teachers not only look on, but encourage the behavior. The 3-6 grade teachers are guiding students through targeted exercises and games as part of the Early Sport program, a research-driven fitness program that exemplifies 'new PE.'

After a demonstration of Furl at a professional conference, Jim Wenzloff was so taken with the powerful new online tool, he wrote a Guide to Furl for his district Web site. "Furl allows you to save anything you view on the Web and share it with teachers or students," said the interactive media consultant for Michigan's Macomb Intermediate School District. "And you can use it for so many educational purposes." Indeed, Furl is a hot topic on school-related blogs such as Wenzloff's Visit My Class, yet most educators are not familiar with the term.

Call it state pride. But when the fight between Connecticut (where District Administration is based) and the federal Department of Education started, at least one argument got my attention.

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