You are here

Administrator Profile

Joseph Lopez, El Paso ISD’s associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction, talks with the district’s Texas Literacy Initiative administrators. The program has been implemented in 39 of El Paso’s 94 schools to promote better reading and writing skills.

With more than 30 years of education experience, Joseph Lopez brought grant money and state funding to help grow student achievement.

Raymond Lauk at Paul Revere Primary School teaching Literacy Through Laughter.

Being fired as chief of the Lyons Elementary School District in Illinois a decade ago was the best thing to happen to Raymond Lauk, at least career-wise. It forced him down a path to the corporate world, specifically GE Security, as the education solutions manager, which taught him how to focus and to later create better school environments.

Lynn B. Moody meets with students on the Sullivan Middle School Student Advisory Council to the Superintendent last December to discuss student issues and concerns.

“Every day on my way home from work I ask myself one question: ‘Did I do anything today that affected the life of one child positively?’” says Rock Hill (S.C.) Public Schools Superintendent Lynn B. Moody.

Hot Springs School District intermediate students share with Superintendent Joyce Littleton Craft their latest literacy projects using iPads.

As a girl growing up in a small community in the east Arkansas town of Cotton Plant, Joyce Littleton Craft calls it a “privilege” to have learned about work ethics and the ideal that “your word is your bond” as she and her siblings tended the family’s cotton crop in what’s called the Delta. “[My parents] stressed the importance of education and reaching your goals, even if that meant working twice as hard,” says Craft.

As part of Superintendent Jim Capolupo’s typical schedule, he reads with students every week in several schools.

Last August, Superintendent Jim Capolupo stood in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building—a grand building in Washington, D.C. a stone’s throw from the White House—where he was invited to tell his story about his school district, Springfield (Pa.) Public Schools.

“People run into me at the grocery store...and say, ‘Thank you for what you do. I don’t have kids in school, but I’m glad you’re here. I know you have a really tough job.’ ”

Those are the kind words Nancy J. McGinley hears from strangers, today, in what she calls the “big, small town” of Charleston, S.C. But they’re a far cry from the frigid reception she felt starting in 2007, during her first few years as superintendent of the expansive, racially and socio-economically diverse Charleston County (S.C.) School District (CCSD).

Charles Glover (center) in one of many administrative meetings at Dallas ISD.

An investment in ‘human capital’ sets Dallas Independent School District apart. The term refers to the teachers and school leaders who support the classrooms. Believing that a team of quality teachers is the single greatest component to moving his district’s students’ academics forward, Dallas Superintendent Mike Miles restructured the district’s human resources department so it would focus more on recruiting and developing an outstanding cadre of instructors.

Eugene G. White reads to students during a “Read Across America” event in his district. One of White’s reforms was to centralize the curriculum, and in turn, better support students.


Eugene G. White is a superintendent of firsts. He was the first in his family to graduate from high school in his segregated town of Phenix City in southeast Alabama. Both academically and athletically inclined, White scored high enough grades—and points—to earn a basketball scholarship to Alabama A&M University, where his education led to his becoming a teacher, basketball coach and the first African-American high school principal in two Indiana high schools.

Josh Powell poses for photo with visiting children.

The resounding cry from Joshua Powell supporters, the Kentucky superintendent who in six years turned two underperforming districts into successful ones, is that his method “actually works.”

His first job as superintendent was at Cloverport Independent where led the district from 165th out of 174 state rankings to 10th in three years.  In 2008, Powell accepted his second superintendent job at Union County Public Schools where he replicated his efforts, leading the district from 161st to 52nd in three years. 

The new program provides a meal for 1,700 students enrolled in after-school activities.

In Dec. 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, which provides federal funds for an after-school dinner program in schools where at least half the students qualify for free or reduced-price lunches. Kansas City (Mo.) Public Schools serves a population of 16,000 students, and 84 percent qualify for free and reduced-price lunches.