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Personalized blended and online learning programs have helped many districts provide access to more courses and to improve student outcomes. But how do you start a program and then scale it across your school and district? In this web seminar, originally broadcast on March 18, 2015, representatives from Getting Smart and educators from an innovative district in Kentucky discussed the key lessons learned in implementing online and blended learning, and how these programs can benefit teachers and students.

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Fuel Education

While blended learning has become a common topic of discussion and an increasingly common district-level strategy for driving student achievement, strategies for successfully making the transition to this new model of learning are often ignored. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on March 17, 2015, presenters explored best practices and lessons learned from blended learning initiatives.

It’s crucial for today’s students to develop foundational technology skills that can be applied to their core subject learning. To accomplish this goal, districts need to coordinate the efforts of technology and academic staff to embed digital learning into the curriculum.

Using technology effectively at the early elementary level has the potential to improve achievement across grade levels in a district, by preparing elementary students to use the digital tools they will need later on in school, and in college and career.

Today’s interactive parents are mobile and always connected, and they expect the same of their school districts. They want access to real-time, personalized information about their student, and they want to know that you can reach them when it counts. More and more, school communication plans must incorporate mobile to more effectively and efficiently connect with digitally fluent parents and students. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on March 3, 2015, presenters discussed some key strategies for successfully developing and implementing a mobile app for any district.

Using effective strategies to personalize the math learning experience is key to reaching all levels of learners, especially Spanish-speaking English Language Learners who vary in their English language abilities, math proficiency and personal circumstances. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on February 17, 2015, educators from an innovative school with an 85 percent Latino population in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, discussed the success they’ve had combining face-to-face instruction with online learning to drive math achievement for their ELL students.

A common challenge with district technology initiatives, particularly BYOD or 1-to-1 programs, is equity of access—ensuring that all students can utilize the same technology, regardless of their socioeconomic status.

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At the 19,700-student Newton County Public Schools in Georgia, administrators established a goal of improving the quality of teaching in the spring of 2012. According to Gary Shattuck, director of technology and media services, the best way to do that was to take inspiration from the sports world, where athletes watch video recordings of themselves to improve their form.

“Teachers really cannot know how they look and present themselves until they see themselves on video,” says Shattuck.

Districts today are often making do with very lean maintenance staffs.

For the 2007-08 school year, Deborah Cody, world language liaison for Pueblo City Schools in southern Colorado, was presented with a very good problem to solve.

“We set up new 30-station computer labs in our high schools and middle schools, and needed programs students could work on in them,” she says.