You are here


When districts use WillowTree Apps, which designs engagement platforms, parents only have to use one login and get access to everything—school calendar, attendance, work—in one space.

New platforms are giving parents the chance to track their children’s progress without having to schedule a parent-teacher conference.

The substantial number of high school graduates who land in higher education unprepared academically and have to take remedial courses to catch up are more likely than other students to quit before earning a two- or four-year diploma. Now, districts in several states are intervening more aggressively than in the past to better prepare struggling high school students for college-level classes.

MIND Research Institute's curriculum of K5 math games, ST Math, is used in 30 states by about 21,000 teachers and 500,000 students.

A blue sky with a few clouds and a penguin named JiJi—along with balloons and the occasional flying saucer—are all the graphics MIND Research Institute needs for its curriculum of K5 math games, ST Math.

In Filament Games’ Reach for the Sun, left, high school students ‘become’ a plant and must find the proper amount of water and nutrients to survive.

The player gets to be an archaeologist trying to stop a criminal who’s defacing ancient Mayan temples. But the player doesn’t get laser cannons or magic swords. Catching this video game vandal requires solving geography puzzles, answering math questions, and passing reading comprehension tests.

 Tom Bailey, director of the Community College Research Center at Teacher’s College at Columbia University, says students who take remedial courses are less likely to stay in college.

Nearly two-thirds of all community college students are referred to “developmental education,” typically in English or math, says Tom Bailey, director of the Community College Research Center at Teacher’s College, Columbia University.

But less than half of the students complete the remedial class, and that number drops sharply for students who are forced to take more than one. The completion rate for students taking three classes, for instance, is in the single digits, Bailey says.

Amplify's Lexica sends students into a virtual library that has a collection of classic literature.

The most cognitively challenging and intellectually stimulating video games are more immersive and can take several hours to play, says Justin Leites, vice president for games at Amplify. That’s why the company, which is developing 30 such educational video games for the 2014-2015 school year, wants to take advantage of students’ time outside the classroom, Leites says.

“There’s a huge amount of research, some recent, some going back decades, showing that what kids do outside the classroom is hugely important to their success,” he says.

Do you ever think about air quality when putting a new floor into a school? Only in the past decade has this been among the questions purchasing officers have seriously considered.

From maintenance to color to price, the options for a school floor—an investment that is expected to last 25 to 30 years—are numerous. Amy Bostock, global brand manager for nora systems, Inc., says it’s only recently that administrators have begun considering different types of flooring. Because easy maintenance was previously the primary, and sometimes only, factor, schools typically had wood floors.

ASCD, which held its annual conference in Chicago in March, promotes advocacy, in part through its Whole Child Initiative.

Professional associations have a reputation for being averse to both change and risk, but they have started to look ahead and almost start from scratch to attract more diverse members and retain the ones they have.

Jeff Brown, right, athletic trainer at Flower Mound High School in Texas, tends to an injured football player during a game.

With the start of football and the rest of the 2013-2014 school athletic calendar, districts are looking at new laws and training recommendations to help avoid deadly health problems among the 7.5 million students who will play high school sports this year.

Students in the Samuel J. Green Charter School listen to a math lesson. As part of the “portfolio” strategy, dozens of independent local and national organizations operate charter schools in the district.

It’s been a decade since Louisiana established the Recovery School District to take over the lowest-performing schools in the state. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the RSD took over almost all the schools in New Orleans, and in the process restructured the city’s school system on an unprecedented level.

Over the past 10 years, New Orleans schools have gone from being some of the lowest performing in the country to becoming a working laboratory for a bold experiment in restructuring an urban public school system.