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Educators still trying to come to grips with No Child Left Behind will soon face another challenge. Although this new program will start in four months, no one knows the rules yet, but everyone knows what's at stake $790 million in grants.

There's no question the raw numbers pouring out of President Bush's fiscal year 2007 budget look bleak for education. It cuts total education funding by 3.8 percent from FY 2006. It proposes to eliminate 42 education programs, including all funding for Perkins Loans, LEAP, education technology, gifted education, parent resource centers, elementary and secondary school counseling, school leadership, safe and drug-free schools state grants, arts in education, and the Close-Up Foundation.

Buying a laptop computer for every student: About $1,000

Hiring a consultant to teach teachers how to use laptops in lessons:

Roughly $1,500/day

Watching students use technology to draw conclusions something they wouldn't

normally be able to do:

Priceless

Another year, another budget, another fight. Educators are saying, and congressmen are agreeing, that the federal education budget proposal of $54.4 billion for 2007 is just not good enough.

Teachers at Oakwood Elementary School in Lakewood, Wash., outside of Seattle, watched TV at their first staff meeting last fall, and the dial was turned to the local news.

Nearly 50 years ago, the U.S. faced a hot scare in the cold war. The Soviet Union launched in 1957 the first satellite, Sputnik, into space, sending the U.S. into a tizzy of fear. So the government poured billions of dollars into the space program as well as better math and science programs in American schools.

Now, the nation's schools are facing an economic scare in part due to countries like China and India taking on more American jobs.

Seattle (Wash.) Public Schools www.seattleschools.org

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