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Few topics strike terror in the hearts of K-12 school administrators like the evolution v. intelligent design debate and with good reason.

It was a heady day for the staff and students of the Poughkeepsie Middle School, a struggling institution just 82 miles north of Manhattan. The students and faculty were greeted by U.S. Sen. Hillary Clinton and Discovery Channel CEO and President Judith A. McHale for the grand opening of the middle school's new state-of-the-art television studio.

Charlie Brown calls it an effort to make the world a smaller place. The distance learning facilitator of the Magnolia (Texas) Independent School District, just 40 miles northwest of Houston, is the technical advisor responsible for connecting his students to videoconferences with students all over the world.

Entrepreneurship may be one of the least understood and potentially beneficial concepts to hit the educational landscape in recent decades. Before schools can gain from entrepreneurship, administrators need to grasp its significance.

Drug dealing in American high schools can look as innocent as buying an ice cream cone. And that is exactly what happened in El Paso, Texas, last year.

An ice cream vendor decided to dish out another flavor last year in the student parking lot at Riverside High School in the Ysleta Independent School District, which borders Mexico, and this time it was Ganja ala Mode.

The legitimate ice cream vendor was handing out ice cream cones filled with marijuana to up to a dozen students every other day and administrators finally caught wind of it from an informant.

She had no financial expertise--in fact, Veronica Klinefelt was a stay-at-home mom with a high school diploma when she won her bid for a seat on the East Detroit School Board in January 1998. But it was enough background to uncover a $3 million construction fraud scheme in her district that sent two board members and two superintendents to jail.

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