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Inside The Law

Tutoring Services See Business Boom

While districts are struggling to meet what many say are unfunded mandates of NCLB, one industry is booming under the landmark education act. Tutoring services across the nation are growing rapidly as they tap into a potential $2 billion market of Title 1 funding.

Another Alternative For Special Ed Students

A new flexibility option under No Child Left Behind gives states the chance to allow 2 percent of students with academic disabilities to take tests that are specifically geared toward their abilities.

Change Coming to No Child Left Behind

A fundamental change in how the Education Department enforces the No Child Left Behind act could affect the education of millions of students as states seek federal approval on everything from teacher quality to the measuring of student progress.

Legislators Critical of Bush's Call to Expand NCLB

President Bush might not have the votes in Congress he needs to move forward on his a $1.5 billion proposal to expand the major tenets of No Child Left Behind to the nation's high schools.

Is Pay-off A Political Punching Bag?

Weeks after it was revealed the U.S. Department of Education paid a political pundit to talk up the No Child Left Behind law, errors in judgment have been acknowledge but the debate continues.

Technology Cuts Run Deep

Nearly a third of federal funding was cut under this year's No Child Left Behind Title II, Part D budget, meaning districts that started to use technology facilitators and started to integrate computers in lessons are getting the rug pulled out from under them, some educators say.

But this time, Congress approved the 28 percent cut in the law's Enhancing Education through Technology Act.

Did the Tail Wag the Dog?

The jury is still out as far as how much some state rule changes in accountability plans for No Child Left Behind affected schools' performances last year.

Bush Likely to Expand NCLB But No Major Changes

The re-election of George W. Bush to a second term likely means the No Child Left Behind Act will be expanded, but not significantly changed, say some education experts.