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News Update

In just the first six months of 2011, 10 states and the District of Columbia have passed legislation supporting school voucher or scholarship tax credit programs. This has been a big year for school advocates. While some states expanded already existing school choice programs, six new programs were created in Arizona, Indiana, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Carolina, and Wisconsin—beating the previous record of five new programs set in 2006.

New regulations under the California Parent Empowerment Law are pending approval by the Office of Administrative Law in late July and give parents further rights to change low-performing schools. The Parent Empowerment Law, passed in January 2010 and known as the "parent trigger law," is one of three similar laws in Connecticut and Mississippi. It came about thanks to Parent Revolution, a non-profit group empowering parents to transform their low-performing schools.

The Common Core State Standards are bringing some changes to curricula across the country—but not just in the classroom. School librarians are preparing for the shift and its new emphasis on 21st-century skills including information literacy, primary resources, independent thinking and complex texts. The New York City Department of Education—the nation's largest school system—is relying on its library staff to implement these standards in the coming years.

candlelight vigil for Tyler Clementi

New Jersey knew it had a bullying problem after a 2009 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that the percentage of students bullied in the state was one point higher than the national average. The momentum surrounding the antibullying movement in the state peaked last September when a Rutgers University student, Tyler Clementi, committed suicide after his roommate streamed a video of Clementi with another male student over the Internet. State legislators then moved quickly to pass the Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights on Jan. 6, 2011, which will be effective Sept. 1.

migrant child worker

There are more than 400,000 migrant children working the fields in 48 states across the United States. They begin working as early as age 12, their days begin as early as 4 a.m. and their home moves wherever the crop season takes them and their families. The backbreaking labor and transient lifestyle causes them to drop out of high school at four times the national rate.

Friend of Education

Tim Carpenter and 13 of his Democratic colleagues from the Wisconsin Senate were honored by the National Education Association with an “NEA’s Friend of Education” award for opposing a bill that would weaken collective bargaining rights.

There is a fine line between making student data available to influence data-driven decisions and still respecting student privacy. For this reason, the U.S. Department of Education has launched a new initiative to elevate the importance of safeguarding the collection, use and disclosure of student records. With this new initiative comes a new position, chief privacy officer, and Kathleen Styles is the first.

In the 2008-2009 school year, Adams County (Colo.) School District 50, just north of Denver, did something only previously attempted by the small rural Chugach school system in Alaska. The struggling district with roughly 10,000 students abandoned the conventional concept of grade levels and implemented a standards-based system, which only advances students to the next level when they have mastered certain skills. Three years later, student achievement is lower than ever before, and the superintendent that guided the district through this reform is stepping down.


Moving on Up

JoAnn Bartoletti, former principal and currently the executive director of the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, will be replacing Gerald Tirozzi this summer as executive director of the National Association of Secondary School Principals.

On March 9, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill that ended collective bargaining rights for public sector employees and thus reversed an era of organized labor in the state. But it didn't stop there. Other states--Indiana, Idaho, Tennessee, and Oklahoma, to name a few--jumped on the bargaining rights bandwagon proposing and, in many cases, passing similar provisions. It's no wonder, then, why the appointment of Paul Kreutzer, a Wisconsin superintendent who was an outspoken supporter of Gov.