You are here

Product Focus

In the United States and around the world, interactive whiteboards continue to be one of the largest and fastest-growing segments of classroom education technology. According to market research firm Future- Source Consulting, more than 300,000 interactive whiteboards were sold in the United States and 750,000 globally in 2009, which represents an increase of 34 percent over 2008. The firm also forecasts a 27 percent increase over 2009 this year, to nearly 1 million units sold worldwide.

Despite the growth of electronic communications, Web based document solutions and digital data systems, paper documents remain a vital part of K12 administration. Bubble sheet exams, parent communications, student academic and disciplinary records, and a wide variety of other communications still relies on paper, but technology has revolutionized its use. Using paper forms, assessments and other documents once required multiple devices such as printers, scanners, copiers and fax machines, as well as third-party companies to scan exams.

The digital modern update of the overhead projector, visual presenters continue to be one of the most popular segments of K12 education technology, as educators find more ways to use them in classrooms across content areas and grade levels. When used with a projector or monitor, these devices enable educators to display everything from documents to dissection specimens, even microscopic objects through the lens of a microscope.

Math instructional content translates well into software, as is evident by the high and ever-growing number of titles available. It covers all grade levels and ranges from assessments and interventions for struggling students to edugaming titles designed to reinforce concepts or provide further challenges for gifted students. But math software is not limited to such circumstances; programs that are supplemental to curricula and designed to integrate into everyday classroom instruction are also a large part of the industry.

Few technologies in the education industry have grown at the pace of video or data projectors. Over the past several years, what was once an expensive luxury has become commonplace in schools as this technology has become increasingly affordable. Today, nearly every major projector manufacturer has a K12 education division, with district level purchases constituting a significant portion of the industry overall.

While school administrators have access to more data than ever before to analyze and monitor the status and progress of their districts, they need sophisticated tools to organize and make sense of it to make the most informed, data-driven decisions. A wealth of information is available, from student test scores to demographic, discipline and immunization reports and a variety of other data.

An increasing number of K12 districts are beginning to install digital signs—for displaying announcements, weather conditions, welcome messages, event information and more—in their lobbies, hallways, libraries or cafeterias. Digital signage can also play an important role as part of an emergency notification system, as administrators can immediately display crisis response information on every connected monitor throughout a school building or district.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 14.2 million computers were in schools across the country in 2005-2006, a ratio of one for every four students and more than 20 times the number in schools in 1984-1985. Along with the tremendous opportunities for student learning afforded by this trend comes the risk of distraction and inappropriate use of computers and the Internet by students. Classroom management software was developed to address these concerns and to help teachers maximize the instructive capabilities of classroom computers.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 14.2 million computers were in schools across the country in 2005-2006, a ratio of one for every four students and more than 20 times the number in schools in 1984-1985. Along with the tremendous opportunities for student learning afforded by this trend comes the risk of distraction and inappropriate use of computers and the Internet by students. Classroom management software was developed to address these concerns and to help teachers maximize the instructive capabilities of classroom computers.

While some districts have been making use of surveillance cameras for years, today's camera technology is less expensive and easier to maintain and operate. These factors, combined with concerns about violence, vandalism, theft and other security issues, have led to a rise in the use of school surveillance. Early privacy concerns about the use of cameras in schools, while not having completely vanished, are beginning to recede, as the average American has begun to accept that surveillance cameras are in use in most public places, from the gas station to the grocery store to the highway.

Pages