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Nutrition Advocates to Schools: Shape Up

Soda is out, but students are exercising less. Junk food is being scrutinized, but recess is still iffy. Childhood obesity rates are climbing and schools, say advocates, must monitor what calories students are taking in and burning up.

Creating Superior Teachers

The skills of 3.1 million teachers in elementary and secondary school classrooms across the nation can make or break school reform, according to a recent report from The Brookings Institution.

"Without the right people standing in front of the classroom, school reform is a futile exercise," according to The Hamilton Project, Identifying Effective Teachers Using Performance On the Job.

The project, named after the nation's first treasury secretary Alexander Hamilton, seeks to advance America's promise of prosperity.

Strong Management Helps Avoid Construction Woes

As New Jersey has learned, lax oversight of school construction programs can cause costly problems. But it doesn't have to be that way. Strong management by state agencies and local school districts can keep programs out of trouble, according to school and construction authorities.

Florida's Anti-Voucher Ruling Challenged

A voucher school advocacy group is looking to change the Florida state's uniformity clause so it would allow for public funds to go toward voucher school programs in the Sunshine state.

State Takes Over New Orleans

Brown v. Board of Ed: 50 Years Later

iPods OK in Class

MP3 players, such as Apple iPods, that entertain children with music and video also are making waves as effective learning tools in schools nationwide, educators say.

Investigation Finds No Propaganda But Questions Linger

An investigation of the U.S. Department of Education's public relations contracts found both "covert propaganda" in one contract and "no covert propaganda" in other contracts.

An investigation by the Government Accountability Office found the Bush administration violated the law by buying favorable coverage of government education policies via payments to conservative commentator Armstrong Williams and by hiring a company to analyze media perceptions of the Republican Party.

Avoiding Large-Scale Contract Problems

Everything that could have gone wrong seemingly did in the Apple computer contract with Cobb County School District in Georgia last summer, according to investigating firm, Kessler International, which specializes in corporate investigations.