Industry News

5/21/2015

5/21/2015

Major items in the Texas district's proposal include a new elementary school, a science and technology center for Allen High School, and a new building to replace the facility housing the freshman campus.

5/21/2015

U.S. public schools beefed up security measures with safety drills and parent notification systems in the years surrounding the massacre at Connecticut's Sandy Hook Elementary School, according to a new government survey.

5/21/2015

Going greener is the focus at Waterbury’s Kaynor Tech, where students are building another “e-house”. The project is part of the nation’s first “green” construction learning laboratories for high school students. The kids are focusing on a clean energy curriculum, learning all about the latest technologies in the field.

5/21/2015

To standardize the criteria that colleges use for granting credit for AP tests, lawmakers are considering passing a law to require public universities and colleges in Illinois to give course credit for scores of 3 or better.

5/21/2015

Students in Kentucky are plotting their career paths and finding the grants, scholarships and other funds to pursue their paths as part of the kid-FRIENDLy initiative, a program funded in 2012 by the largest Race To The Top-District grant awarded.

5/21/2015

A record 99 percent of school budgets passed in New York with just nine spending plans rejected. New York's nearly 700 school districts proposed an average spending increase of 1.9 percent and a tax levy increase of 1.6 percent.

5/20/2015

5/20/2015

A new wave of applications connects teachers with mobile access to professional development and expands opportunities for collaboration with mentors and peers. Some apps allow teachers to videotape themselves so they can get instant peer feedback while others can save districts money on travel costs.

5/20/2015

With 63 percent of public schools not having access to broadband speeds needed for digital learning, administering the new standardized tests to students online has revealed a large tech divide in the nation's classrooms. In rural and low-income districts, only 14 percent meet high-speed internet targets.

5/20/2015

There is a way to bridge the gap between the technology-savvy and the technology-challenged. InfoSnap developed a school and district's guide to achieving active family participation in under-served and low-income areas when implementing an online enrollment and registration solution.

5/20/2015

McClymonds and Oakland Technical high schools will share a $5 million Intel grant over five years to develop computer science and engineering curriculums, buy computers, train teachers and offer employee mentors and job shadowing programs.

5/20/2015

While the Leavenworth High School yearbook is still a printed product, readers can watch several videos while looking through this year's publication. Using the Aurasma app, readers can use their smartphones or other devices to watch videos that are linked to photographs in the yearbook.

5/20/2015

Code.org is teaming up with The College Board to push for more computer science courses in U.S. high schools and to increase the number of female and minority students taking those courses. Curriculums, tools, training and funding will be provided to school districts that qualify.

5/20/2015

The next step for education technology is to foster and enhance memorable moments with educators, get teens excited to learn, and make students feel invested in their education anew. With time, there will only be more technology saturation, more tech-literate kids, and more opportunities to use tech in the classroom.

5/20/2015

Schools that banned students from carrying smartphones saw a 6.4 percent increase in test scores. The impact on underachieving students was much more significant with their average test scores rising by 14 percent, according to a study of 91 schools in England by the London School of Economics.

5/20/2015

The Louisiana House voted down a bill that would have mandated the immediate return to Orleans Parish of all schools that had been in the Recovery system for at least five years and were no longer failing. The Recovery School District took over 80 percent of New Orleans public schools after Hurricane Katrina.

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