DA Archive

9/28/2011

9/28/2011

The National Center on Response to Intervention (NCRTI) has added the Fast ForWord? Language series program from Scientific Learning to its ?Instructional Intervention Tools Chart", which helps educators and families select instructional intervention programs that best meet their needs.

9/28/2011

In a downtrodden economy, parents are turning to the government for help cutting costs anyway they can. Thanks to the National School Lunch Program, eligible families have their children's lunches--and sometimes breakfasts--provided free of charge by the government, saving about $5 a week per child.

It may not seem like much, but for a typical 40-week school year, that's $200 per child. For a multiple-child household already struggling to make ends meet, that help makes a world of difference.

9/28/2011

A renowned, innovative after-school program that helps students control their tempers, deal with nerves, take responsibility and make good life choices is going national after receiving a $1 million donation.

WINGS for Kids started in Charleston 15 years ago and organizers say it's the only program of its kind teaching emotional skills to elementary school children in an after-school setting.

It now operates in four elementary schools, largely in low-income areas of Charleston, and 3,500 students have passed through WINGS since it was founded in 1996.

9/28/2011

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) struck a bipartisan tone Tuesday, arguing that the federal requirements for evaluating students and teachers set out in No Child Left Behind should be scuttled in favor of state-set standards.

?Everyone knows that today every American?s job is on the line, and that better schools mean better jobs. Schools and jobs are alike in this sense: Washington can?t create good jobs, and Washington can?t create good schools,? writes Alexander, who served as education secretary under President George H.W. Bush, in a New York Times op-ed.

9/28/2011

The state is changing the way it counts students, a move that is expected to cost the county?s schools more than a half million dollars in state aid.

Starting this year, 90 percent of a school district?s student populations--the number that determines the district?s per-pupil state aid--will be based on the number of students in attendance on fall count day. The other 10 percent will be from the February count in the same calendar year, which is the previous school year.

The old method weighted the fall count at 75 percent and the winter count at 25 percent.

9/28/2011

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan on Tuesday said education reform must start with comprehensive change.

Duncan talked to NBC Miami from New York, where he was attending an NBC News hosted summit called Education Nation.

"Do unions have to change? Absolutely, but so does management, so do school boards. We all have to look in the mirror we and have to move outside our comfort zone, and say we're not just fighting for our children, we're fighting for our country,? Duncan said via satellite.

9/28/2011

Getting students prepared for the real world and ready to compete on the world stage is the focus of NBC's "Education Nation".

Right now, U.S. students rank 25th in math and 17th in science among 35 developed countries. The average teacher salary of $45,000 a year has also been a concern. That low number, as well as school budget cuts, is causing good teachers to turn to other jobs.

Wake County Schools Supt. Tony Tata joined NBC-17 from the Education Nation Summit in New York and shared his thoughts on teacher retention.

9/28/2011

The Waukesha School District could recover some of its lost funding after five Wisconsin school districts saw millions of dollars disappear in failed investments. The companies that sold the investments to the school districts now face prosecution from the Securities and Exchange Commission.

9/28/2011

Some New Jersey parochial schools facing closure because of declining enrollment may be allowed to convert into a public charter school, under a bill that passed the Senate yesterday.

The schools could not teach religion or display religious symbols, and if their name has a religious reference, it would have to be changed, according to the bill. The state would oversee the schools.

9/28/2011

Some of the nation?s largest oil refineries are seeking huge tax refunds that could force school districts and local governments across Texas to give back tens of millions of dollars they were counting on to pay teachers and provide other services.

The owners of the refineries--including San Antonio-based Valero Energy Corp.--want the tax breaks in exchange for buying pollution-control equipment. But the cost to public schools would be dear, coming only months after legislators slashed education spending by more than $4 billion.

9/28/2011

For Chuck Collins's advanced placement environmental sciences class, Facebook is a must.

Mr. Collins, who teaches at Missouri's Clayton High School, posts between 10 and 15 articles a week on a page he's set up for the class. Students need to read at least one of the articles and write a thoughtful, substantive response that weaves in class material in the comments section below the post.

"I can do things with [the Facebook page] that I absolutely could not do with more mainstream types of teaching," says Collins.

9/27/2011

9/27/2011

Meru Networks, Inc. transforms on-campus wireless connectivity with the industry?s only wireless solution for network-in-control Wi-Fi access replacing unscalable client-in-control network access approaches.

9/27/2011

Learning.com has added functionality to the 21st Century Skills Assessment taken nationally by more than half a million students. The Web-based assessment now prescribes lessons and activities from the award-winning EasyTech digital literacy curriculum.

9/27/2011

President Obama is offering to free public schools from many of the requirements of a controversial federal education law. But as states consider whether to take him up on it, they're realizing the offer comes with some costs.

9/27/2011

For Banned Books Week, some schools put books that often top banned lists on prominent display. Others host readings from frequently banned novels.

The Bay County school district in Florida went one step farther, holding a mock school board meeting in Panama City to simulate discussion that would occur if a parent wanted a book banned. The county made headlines 25 years ago when the district superintendent banned more than 60 books from classrooms and school libraries after parent complaints.

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