Top News

5/1/2015

5/1/2015

An amended version of a bill that would allow victims and relatives of school violence to sue school districts passed out of committee in the Colorado House. The bill would raise a school's responsibility for safety to a duty of "reasonable care" and creates an exemption to governmental immunity that protects against most lawsuits.

5/1/2015

A new bill will implement a $2 million grant program so more schools can offer breakfast in school. Schools where 70 percent of the student population is eligible for free or reduced-price lunches would be eligible for grants to help them implement the program.

5/1/2015

The Maine Principals’ Association approved expanding the state’s high school basketball ranks from four to five classes beginning next winter. The five-class format was developed largely to address changing demographics throughout the state, including a shrinking student base and a southward population migration.

5/1/2015

Students would take fewer tests and they would be administered closer to the end of the school year under an Ohio legislative panel's recommendations. The committee also said the state should find new vendors if the companies that provide the current tests don’t revamp them.

5/1/2015

A judge cut prison sentences by more than half for three former Atlanta educators convicted in a cheating scandal. The former administrators were each given three years in prison rather than the seven years they received at the original sentencing.

5/1/2015

The Kansas Supreme Court said that it will not consider another appeal of the ongoing school finance case until after a district court panel finishes its deliberations. The plaintiffs originally argued in 2010 that cuts made overall school funding unconstitutionally low, and that the cuts fell disproportionately on the poorest school districts.

5/1/2015

President Obama announced an initiative that would make $250 million worth of e-books available to young, low-income readers for free. The effort will work through a new app, being developed by the New York Public Library, that has the buy-in of all the major publishers.

4/30/2015

4/30/2015

The Michigan Supreme Court heard arguments during a visit to the Ann Arbor high school in an effort to introduce students to the workings of the state's highest appellate court.

4/30/2015

New York City's Education Department failed to report hundreds of violent incidents at at 10 city schools as required by law, according to a new 2011-13 audit. The state-mandated SAVE Act requires officials to report these incidents so that officials can intervene if safety is threatened.

4/30/2015

The Gloucester County School Board sent more than 1,000 pages of documentation to the U.S. Department of Justice regarding a federal civil rights complaint filed by a high school transgender student. The board instituted a policy in December restricting students to either single-stall restrooms or the restrooms designated for their biological gender.

4/30/2015

A bill passed by the state Senate would force school districts to share more of their tax funding with charter schools, but critics say it may open the coffers unfairly by removing a funding exemption from the shared revenue model.

4/30/2015

Although recent legislation will mandate that virtual classrooms would be available in every Alabama school system by the 2016-17 school year, Montgomery Public Schools will be getting a head start by launching a virtual high school pilot program this fall .

4/30/2015

The city is getting ready to cut its first checks to charter schools that are paying for their own space — an outlay that could stretch to nearly $10 million for this school year, based on charter school enrollment figures.

4/29/2015

4/29/2015

After examining closed charter and district schools, a new Thomas B. Fordham Institute study found that moving from school to school typically has a negative effect on students, but when the movement is forced by school closure, the students end up better off.

4/29/2015

A decade after New York City shut down a large, struggling middle school in Brooklyn and replaced it with two smaller ones, the Education Department is putting those schools back together. The most important factor in whether other schools will be merged would not be their size, but whether one school has a principal capable of running both schools.

Pages