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11/20/2013

11/20/2013

The rise of 1-to-1 programs has pushed a surge of mobile devices into schools, creating a whole new logistical challenge for district CIOs. These technology managers are wise to deploy a mobile device management system to keep track of both the hardware and the data.

10/9/2013

10/9/2013

The superintendent needs to convince the public that poor children deserve iPads and that Los Angeles USD can be trusted to run the $1-billion program wisely.

10/9/2013

At East Noble School Corporation in Indiana, every kindergartner and first grader uses an iPod Touch, students in grades 2-4 learn on iPads, and students in grades 5-12 are given Lenovo laptops. Here, textbooks are a thing of the past.

10/9/2013

A North Carolina school district has suspended the use of 15,000 tablets after reports of multiple hardware issues, including the device’s charger melting at home. Districts everywhere have had high hopes that the affordable tablet would help bring K12 education into the 21st century. But melting accessories are not a good sign.

10/7/2013

10/7/2013

Campaign introduces mindfulness to students, or the intentional thought of how actions may affect ourselves and others and the ability to evaluate our choices.

10/3/2013

10/3/2013

Workers at the Los Angeles United School District (LAUSD) have started confiscating iPads that bypassed the devices' security measures, according to the Los Angeles Times. The tampered iPads could access unauthorized websites and apps, such as Facebook, YouTube, and Pandora.

10/2/2013

10/2/2013

Willowwind School is going mobile. The private Iowa City school is piloting a new program this year where every fifth- and sixth-grade student has an iPad. Families purchased the devices themselves and students use them at home and at school on a daily basis.

9/30/2013

9/30/2013

For the first time in Massachusetts, a special education school is equipping each of its students with a personal iPad.

9/26/2013

9/26/2013

It took exactly one week for nearly 300 students at Roosevelt High School to hack through security so they could surf the Web on their new school-issued iPads, raising new concerns about a plan to distribute the devices to all students in the district.

9/25/2013

9/25/2013

Widespread poverty is inspiring some school districts to create iPad initiatives as a way to give students hope. In California, Coachella Valley Unified, for instance, where 90 percent of students live in poverty, will issue iPads to all 19,000 students -- preschool through high school -- by November.

9/25/2013

Educators who work in low-income schools know that technology could help them understand student needs better and create more engaging learning experiences. But tight budgets make some of the more ambitious schemes, like 1-to-1 computer access, a distant dream. Yet it's precisely the schools with under-served populations that have the most to gain from technology.

9/25/2013

The Uniontown Area School Board in western Pennsylvania agreed to purchase refurbished computers, projectors, and necessary cabling equipment from the construction fund at an estimated cost of $100,000. School board member William Ritternhouse said it was necessary for the district to buy the equipment because the installation of the new computer system is going much slower than anticipated.

9/18/2013

9/18/2013

Annual back-to-school spending is a hot market: $26.7 billion for K12 students, and a whopping $45.8 billion at the college level, according to data from Ceros. Much of that was done online, where 21 percent of shoppers used social networks to look for sales and promotions (83 percent), find recommendations (67 percent), and post product comments (26 percent).

9/18/2013

Matt Dillabough and Max Colbert, the two 14-year-olds behind the Menlo App Academy, have a mission to teach the USA to code. And that could fill a growing need for U.S. employers.

9/11/2013

9/11/2013

Raleigh County students are going high-tech this year, becoming the first public school system in West Virginia to rely on iPads instead of textbooks. The program is called iRaleigh.

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