Few principals in New York gave teachers low marks in evaluations

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Few principals across New York state gave their teachers low scores in the 2012-13 school year as they implemented a new evaluation system that calls for in-depth classroom observations, according to data released by the state on Thursday.

Ninety-eight percent of teachers statewide received top ratings, “effective” or “highly effective,” on the 60 percent of their evaluations made up primarily of observations, the data shows. Less than 1 percent of teachers earned the lowest rating on their observations.

Nearly nine times as many teachers, or about 4 percent, received low ratings on the 40 percent of their evaluations that use a combination of state and local tests. The difference is likely spark a debate over what parts of an evaluation should be used to measure teacher quality—and what parts are the most accurate.

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