School-based brain training shown to alleviate ADHD

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

With more than one in 10 children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, parents and doctors alike have been eager to find alternatives to prescription stimulant medications like Ritalin or Adderall. Some of these options include computer programs that train the brain to increase attention span and a therapy called neurofeedback where a practitioner teaches children how to keep their brain calm and focused.

In an effort to compare which technique was better, Tufts Medical Center researchers conducted a study in 104 Boston-area elementary school children with ADHD — half of whom were taking stimulants — randomly assigning them to have neurofeedback or cognitive computer training at school three times a week for five months, or no therapy at all. Both the neurofeedback and the cognitive training enabled the children to have longer attention spans, but only the neurofeedback reduced hyperactive and impulsive behaviors, according to the study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

While the benefits lasted six months after the therapy ended for the neurofeedback group, they seemed to diminish a little in the cognitive training group. Research assistants went into classrooms to observe the children without knowing which ones had the neurofeedback and which ones had the cognitive training or no therapy.

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