K12 Headlines

4/9/2015

4/9/2015

The No Child Left Behind Act, a product of good bipartisan intentions and bad legislative drafting, is closer than ever to a rewrite that was supposed to have happened eight years ago. But the new bill would allow so much flexibility that it's unclear what would happen in states that don't try hard to reduce achievement gaps.

4/9/2015

A decade’s worth of work by tribal leaders, educators, legislators and activists has shown that having difficult conversations about issues of race, history and culture is necessary and productive. The state's House and the Senate passed bills that require schools to incorporate the history, culture and government of the nearest Indian tribes into the social studies curriculum.

4/9/2015

New Jersey needs to bring greater awareness to the risk cardiac problems present to student athletes. A new bill is being proposed that would help recognize and prevent cardiac illnesses in children through cardiac history-related family history questions and adequate training for health care practitioners to identify these conditions.

4/9/2015

Colorado schools are not required to obtain written parental consent before students take part in an every-other-year health and behavior survey, according to a formal opinion from the state Attorney General.

4/9/2015

A new bill introduced in the state Senate aims to end the uncertainty of exactly how many students participated in PARCC testing. The proposal would require all schools to publicly release test participation rates within five days of the conclusion of testing.

4/9/2015

The West Virginia Board of Education denied requests by all 27 school districts that applied for make-up-day forgiveness. The districts will have to further extend their last days of school to meet the new requirement this year for 180 separate instructional days.

4/9/2015

Seattle School Board members mostly voiced displeasure at the notion of approving charter schools to operate within their district. Many members stressed that trying to green-light and oversee the publicly funded but independently run schools would demand significant staff time.

4/9/2015

School districts in Tennessee are weighing their options as a controversial guns-in-parks bill makes its way through the state legislature. Some school districts are concerned how the bill will impact student athletes who frequently practice and play games at parks. It is illegal to carry weapons where school events occur.

4/8/2015

4/8/2015

Young people are flocking to social messaging apps like Instagram, Kik and Yik Yak. And where they go, advertisers are sure to follow—unless, of course, that path leads to where bullies roam free and harassment is rampant. How successful these apps are in warding off trolls could determine the future of their businesses.

4/8/2015

As a school system, New Hanover County Schools' Superintendent Tim Markley and his staff could provide information but were prohibited from actively campaigning for a $160 million school bond. The administration utilized online tools — such as a detailed website, Twitter, Facebook, email, PSAs, YouTube videos and Google Analytics — for a coordinated information campaign.

4/8/2015

Plaguing districts with increasing frequency are distributed denial of service attacks that saturate servers with so many external communications requests that they cannot respond to legitimate school traffic, such as teachers trying to access online grades. Districts should frequently update data-access policies, strengthen cloud provider security and consider anti-attack software.

4/8/2015

Syringa Mountain School became Idaho’s first public Waldorf school when it opened in September. With an emphasis on nature, the school doesn’t expose its students to technology until third grade. But this approach to education is proving problematic as students prepare for the new Smarter Balanced assessments standardized tests this spring.

4/8/2015

Tech-savvy students and others are using smartphone apps, social media and Internet phone services to make anonymous reports of bombs and other threats of violence at schools. In most cases, it turns out to be a hoax. Still, the use of the modern technologies has made it that much harder to determine if a threat is real and to find the culprit.

4/8/2015

Cleveland taxpayers were stuck with a multi-million dollar bill for technology upgrades in schools that they didn't have to pay — if only the city school district had followed the right procedure to receive federal E-Rate rebates on the costs. A panel found the district failed to collect rebates on internet connectivity and communications equipment installed between 2006 and 2011.

4/8/2015

A critical computer science pipeline to Washington’s future economic success is far too narrow. House Bill 1813 establishes a much needed grant program to train teachers to run AP computer classes but has remained blocked due to a failure to restore the state’s No Child Left Behind waiver. The state leadership needs to resolve the impasse during budget negotiation to open the coveted STEM-jobs spigot.

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