K12 Headlines

1/6/2015

1/6/2015

Arizona's Superintendent of Public Instruction John Huppenthal is claiming Tucson USD is violating state law by continuing to teach ethnic-studies classes. He threatened to withhold 10 percent of the district's funding unless the district provides his former office with more information about the curriculum.

1/6/2015

Online self-study Mango Languages courses, providing access to over 60 languages, interactive learning and cultural understanding, have been launched by Eton Institute.

1/6/2015

Five charter schools are asking to add more than 900 seats in response to the continuing demand for school choice. Although charter school enrollment has become a growing presence in Rhode Island, it remains a fraction of the state’s 140,000 students with about 7,000 enrolled students.

1/6/2015

The Idaho Department of Education is offering grants for schools to implement a hands-on educational garden program. Grants can be used to start a garden program that enhances nutrition education, classroom curriculum, and increases the understanding and awareness of foods and nutrition.

1/6/2015

Only 11 new charter schools opened this school year in the entire state. The slowed growth this school year signals greater caution after a particularly tumultuous year for charters. More charter schools closed last school year in Columbus alone than opened this school year statewide.

1/6/2015

The Waverly School Board has hired a new superintendent to take the place of Debra Rust when she retires at the end of the school year. Along with acting as the new superintendent, Tri-City High School Principal Dustin Day will will also perform the role of elementary school principal.

1/6/2015

The Ohio school district is expected to approve the hiring of Craig Hockenberry as its next school leader. Hockenberry has served as the superintendent of Manchester Local Schools. He’ll replace Three Rivers Superintendent Rhonda Bohannon, who is retiring at the end of January.

1/5/2015

1/5/2015

The gap between what wealthy districts and poor districts spend to educate children has widened dramatically in the four years since GOP Gov. Tom Corbett took office, amid deep budget-balancing cuts in state aid.

1/5/2015

Gov. Nikki Haley and state lawmakers are fighting a court order aimed at improving the state’s school system in rural, poor districts. In two petitions filed with the South Carolina Supreme Court, attorneys asked the justices to rehear a landmark school equity lawsuit that rural school districts brought against the state more than 20 years ago.

1/5/2015

A three-judge panel in Shawnee County District Court ruled that the state is not meeting its constitutional duty to adequately fund K12 schools. If the state, already facing a revenue shortfall, is ordered to increase state funding for education significantly, lawmakers would not have to grapple with that issue until 2016.

1/5/2015

The Baltimore Ravens and The One Love Foundation are partnering to offer a new film curriculum to inspire Maryland high school and college students to end relationship violence, including the rollout of One Love's Escalation feature film-based workshop curriculum and a team-based initiative.

1/5/2015

Blooming Kids Software, which makes teaching programs for autistic, learning disabled and young children, has added to its list of apps that run on Android mobile devices.

1/5/2015

MouseGate.com lauched its new website, including a new series of books targeting the younger audience, and its call for new authors to write books that center around Walt Disney locations around the world.

1/5/2015

The current system that rates only 1 percent of New York's teachers as ineffective is too lenient. The Regents, districts and state legislators need to strengthen the system. Not every student gets A grades and not every teacher should either.

1/5/2015

A new poll showed 79 percent of those surveyed had a favorable opinion of Michigan's public school teachers and employees with 45 percent saying they were paid too little. The poll also showed 51 percent of those polled believe there is not enough funding for schools to provide a quality education.

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