K12 Headlines

8/10/2015

8/10/2015

This just might be the most challenging year in Kansas education in a generation. State funding, teachers leaving the state and hiring issues are plaguing districts across the state.

8/10/2015

By staggering the start of classes, smaller groups of students can ease into the school year, get to know their teachers, navigate through their buildings and learn about school rules and procedures. Addressing those back-to-school details early can alleviate a lot of problems down the road, experts say.

8/10/2015

In addition to changing its name to NAF, the National Academy Foundation announced that Citi Foundation has made a $3.2 million, five-year investment to the Future Ready Innovation Fund. In its first year, the funding will support expanding entrepreneurship training in NAF schools through the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship.

8/10/2015

Duval County schools suspended kindergarten students a total of 962 times last year. That was 8 percent more than the year before and 28 percent higher than five years ago. Suspensions have fallen in nearly every grade level in Duval in recent years, but not in kindergarten.

8/10/2015

Many people believe video games are intellectually lazy and have a poor effect on students. There are, however, a growing number of teachers, students, and parents who are using one video game in particular as an educational tool.

8/10/2015

With approval from the United States Department of Education, Connecticut said it would make the SAT a requirement, administered without cost to students, beginning in the 2015-16 school year. The SAT replaces an existing statewide exam amid widespread concern that the nation’s students are tested too much.

8/10/2015

AASA, The School Superintendents Association, announced that breakfast will become available to more than 288,000 students in nearly 400 schools across the nation through a grant from the Walmart Foundation. It is part of $10.5 million in grants that the foundation is giving this fall to support school feeding and nutrition education programs.

8/10/2015

For four weeks, 120 students spend six hours a day at school. They start with 3 1/2 hours of reading, writing and math instruction in classes of about 12 students led by a certified teacher. Next is lunch, then two hours of enrichment in topics ranging from ceramics and comic book design to archaeology and Tae Kwan Do.

8/10/2015

Studies show that, academically, nonwhite teachers produce more favorable outcomes for students of similar backgrounds; emotionally and socially, these educators serve as role models who share students’ racial and ethnic identity. What hasn’t gotten much attention, however, are the potential gains for white students.

8/10/2015

Students will no longer face criminal sanctions — penalties that could include jail time — for skipping school. But there is likely to be more pressure on schools—and on parents, who could face more cases if their kids fail to show up for class.

8/7/2015

8/7/2015

Moving funding from the Education Trust Fund in order to solve today's General Fund shortfall is a short-sighted decision. The economic future of Alabama heavily depends on the strength of the education students in its schools receive now.

8/7/2015

The proposed ballot measure would authorize the creation or expansion of up to a dozen charter schools in Massachusetts each year. It would direct state education officials to give priority to applications in the lowest-performing 25 percent of school districts and those with long waiting lists for charter seats.

8/7/2015

“Settling" a buyout with staffers who are ineffective or behaving badly is common practice for many school districts. While paying someone not to work may be the less-expensive alternative than drawn-out litigation or arbitration, it still costs public dollars that could be better spent elsewhere.

8/7/2015

An approved plan calls for creating more programs and opportunities for students to develop the skills needed to get into the Buffalo’s criterion schools. Now, the U.S. Department of Education will decide whether the plan is a strong enough response to allegations of discrimination in the admissions practices.

8/7/2015

The Minnesota district offered the superintendent position to Carlton Jenkins to replace Aldo Sicoli, who resigned to take the superintendent job at Roseville Area Schools. Jenkins comes to the district from Atlanta Public Schools, where he served as the chief academic officer.

Pages