K12 Headlines

2/19/2014

2/19/2014

Utah House Speaker Becky Lockhart unveiled her plan to invest up to $300 million for technology in schools, but a soon-to-be released report suggests the price tag to put devices in every Utah student’s hands might actually be much steeper. A draft of the report, from a work group associated with the Governor’s Education Excellence Commission, pegs the cost of 1-to-1 devices in Utah schools at as much as $750 million for the first year.

2/19/2014

In partnership with its state associations, the National School Boards Association has launched www.standup4publicschools.org, a new national campaign to highlight the success of public education.

2/19/2014

House committee members expressed some support for a bill prompted by a reporter’s efforts to test security at Kirkwood High School that resulted in a lockdown last month.

2/19/2014

The Orleans Parish School Board and state Recovery School District are finalizing a cooperative agreement spelling out who will handle various citywide education services and potentially shifting several functions to the local board.

2/19/2014

City lawmakers said that they were shocked by newly published reports of school violence and plan to hold hearings to address the hundreds of injury claims filed by teachers.

2/19/2014

The challenges of rural schools are many of the same (though not all) that low-income public schools face across the country: inadequate access to technology and broadband, tight budgets, and educators who have not been trained in using technology in meaningful ways. But these hurdles did not deter Daisy Dyer Duerr, Prek-12 Principal of St. Paul Public Schools in St. Paul, Ark.

2/19/2014

The focus on hiring STEM teachers is getting a boost in Hillsborough County, Fla., thanks to the district’s recent acceptance into a national program that is dedicated to filling the void. Hillsborough is one of a handful in the nation, and the only one in Florida, participating in the “100K in 10” initiative launched by President Obama in 2011 to train, hire and retain 100,000 STEM teachers over 10 years.

2/19/2014

Third-grade students at Los Amigos Elementary School in Tucson had a dilemma to solve—how to best save a turtle from the polluted Ganges River in India. After studying the issues, the students worked side by side with engineers from Raytheon Missile Systems to design and build a complex water filter system to clean the river and save the turtle.

2/19/2014

New Jersey’s departing Commissioner of Education, Chris Cerf, has a new gig at the education technology firm Amplify Insight. If the Garden State is truly committed to education reform, it will find another commissioner cut from the same cloth.

2/19/2014

In Rhode Island, we invest wisely in our children and schools. But despite the progress we've made, we have much more to do to ensure that all our students are achieving. First, we need to welcome technology into the classroom—not just as a tool or resource, but as an essential element in the process of teaching and learning. 

2/19/2014

After weeks of complaints from parents and national media coverage, leaders of the Salt Lake City School District board are launching an independent audit into why dozens of students had their cafeteria lunches thrown away last month.

2/19/2014

The farm curriculum, although still relatively unusual, has been replicated in other Kansas schools and proven successful in more urban environments, including Chicago and Philadelphia.

2/19/2014

The company awarded schools in four districts a total of $85,000 in grants in partnership with Project Lead The Way to support the implementation of STEM curricula for students.

2/19/2014

The National Association of Secondary School Principals and the National Association of Elementary School Principals released recommendations on how to best assist school leaders with the challenges they face with widespread state adoption of new teacher evaluation systems.

2/19/2014

Because magnets are fully part of public school systems – their teachers are unionized and they follow district rules, while charters are run by private entities and are typically not unionized – reviving them is seen as part of an effort to save public schools.

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