K12 Headlines

5/1/2014

5/1/2014

The pressure put on teachers to prepare young students for Common Core, college and careers is too much and should be replaced with inspiring them to explore and discover their learning passions.

5/1/2014

These days, every kid has a list for the start of school. These costs pile up. On top of this pile, Illinois is now considering passing along the cost of required testing to students. The schools should pay, while the role of the parents ought to be to encourage studying.

5/1/2014

Connecticut’s Achievement Gap Task Force is drafting a master plan to ensure that every single child, regardless of race, income or ZIP code, gets a high-quality education. Particularly encouraging in the Task Force’s plan is the focus on early childhood education, especially early literacy.

5/1/2014

Scholastic launched Storia School Edition, a subscription-based e-book solution for pre-K through six, for group and individual classroom reading, and Core Clicks, a web-based instructional program for K5 that supports content area reading in social studies and science.

5/1/2014

A new study from the University of Arkansas found that charters in Tennessee received 15.3 percent more funds than district schools from 2007 through 2011. On a national scale, the opposite was true with districts taking in more in per-pupil funds than charters in their states.

5/1/2014

The bill places limits on the private, nonsectarian school transfer option. The bill would modify the 1993 transfer law requiring unaccredited school districts to pay tuition and provide transportation for students who want to attend an accredited school in the same or adjacent county.

5/1/2014

The West Virginia School Building Authority has decided on how it would distribute $43 million in funding. Board members said they received $100 million in requests this year and chose to fund schools in small, rural counties.

4/30/2014

4/30/2014

When schools need technology and districts can't provide it, sometimes the only way to find the funds is to get creative. Parents and teachers working to raise money for their schools are using technology-focused ideas, such as a tech scavenger hunt, crowdfunding sites and more.

4/30/2014

Latina women made up only two percent of scientists and engineers in 2010 in the U.S. A California after-school program, DIY Girls, is now working to change those numbers by teaching skills such as soldering electronics and using 3D printers.

4/30/2014

Changing industry requirements can mean even the most traditional career tech fields will require more training. While some programs are in cutting-edge fields, like biotechnology, robotics and athletic health care, many are the same programs that have been offered for decades.

4/30/2014

Discovery Education has launched Digital Leader Corps. Featuring professional learning, pedagogy and tools, the new professional development service works collaboratively with school districts to help participating educators learn to integrate educational technologies and digital media into classroom instruction.

4/30/2014

The Obama administration has invested in opportunity for our nation's young people, working at each stage of a child's development to ensure that kids have the ability to succeed and thrive. But, for at least those interested in STEM fields, new FCC rules could waste part of that investment and stifle innovation.

4/30/2014

Five Montclair schools will lose their technology specialist positions to accommodate additional physical education and music instruction teachers. Other schools will see a boost in the latter two positions while retaining their technology specialists.

4/30/2014

Filament Games announced the release of Crazy Plant Shop: Heredity Unit. Crazy Plant Shop is the first release of the PLEx (Play, Learn, Experiment): Life Science series from Filament Games' Filament Learning division. Each Crazy Plant Shop unit explores a scientific subject with games and an accompanying curriculum.

4/30/2014

To help alleviate the skills gap, private sector industries have begun making their own investments in education. In the U.S., too few students will find their way into STEM fields on their own. They need to be shown a path, and that entails getting them excited about science and technology at an early age.

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