K12 Headlines

4/7/2014

4/7/2014

School officials have commissioned an enrollment study to determine if the drop in students is part of a larger demographic shift that is being felt in many suburban school districts or if it is yet another lingering effect of the school shooting that claimed the lives of 20 children and six educators in December 2012.

4/7/2014

Twenty-seven states mandate that schools provide programs or services to gifted children. Michigan is not among that group. Nor is Michigan among the 32 states that have a mandate to identify children who are gifted.

4/7/2014

One hundred ninth-graders will effectively start college this fall when they enter a six-year academy where they will earn an associate's degree upon graduation and a chance to be "first in line" for a job at IBM.

4/7/2014

The Nutrients for Life Foundation and Discovery Education are launching a new online program, “From the Ground Up: The Science of Soil,” designed to teach middle school students about soil science and nutrients in agriculture. The program includes lesson plans, interactive tools bilingual family activities and more.

4/7/2014

The New York State United Teachers cited the "failed" rollout of Common Core academic standards, and related student tests and teacher evaluations, in calling for removal of New York Education Commissioner John B. King Jr.

4/4/2014

4/4/2014

McLean County Medical Society is sponsoring a Human Anatomy Cadaver Dissection Lab for advanced-level high school students interested in careers in medicine. Labs, which will cost no money but offer no credit, will be limited to students who have the interest, maturity and intelligence to work on dissection.

4/4/2014

The Bangor School Committee approved a $43.7 million budget for fiscal year 2015, an increase of 2.42 percent over this year’s budget. The increase is to accommodate the rising costs of personnel and utilities coupled with a nearly $1 million decrease in funding from the state.

4/4/2014

Eric Williams, currently superintendent for Virginia’s York County schools, will become the new superintendent overseeing Loudoun County Public Schools' more than 65,000 students as of this summer. He will succeed Dr. Edgar B. Hatrick III, who has served as superintendent for 23 years.

4/4/2014

The Buffalo School Board voted to terminate Faith Morrison Alexander, a chief of school leadership, and Yamilette Williams, chief of curriculum, assessment and instruction, because they lacked the New York district leader certification needed to do their jobs. Despite earlier intentions to try to retain them as interns, there were too many job responsibilities they could not fulfill in that role.

4/4/2014

Under current state law, seniority is used as the sole factor in staffing decisions in Pennsylvania's districts, with the recent exception of Philadelphia. House Bill 1722 presents an opportunity for the state to fix this and protect excellent teachers by reforming the practice of seniority-based layoffs.

4/4/2014

Northampton's school committee named John Provost, currently the superintendent of the North Brookfield Public Schools, as the city's new superintendent. He will replace Brian Salzer, who left the post for a job in Germany after only two years.

4/4/2014

The new visual learning programs build on ST Math’s pre-K through fifth grade curricula and expand middle and high school offerings, which were limited to intervention and fluency programs. The new programs are ST Math: Grade 6, ST Math: Middle School Supplement and ST Math: High School Intervention.

4/4/2014

Faced with a $75 million shortfall, the Camden City School District announced plans to eliminate 575 positions, resulting in as many as 400 layoffs. The layoffs are attributed to declining enrollment, overspending and cuts in federal funding. The cuts amount to a 32 percent reduction in central office staffing and 20 percent in school staffing.

4/4/2014

StudentFirst Academy's charter board, which won state approval to open the west Charlotte charter school in August, cited ever-deepening financial problems as it surrendered its state charter on April 3. On that night, board members began telling parents that their students’ last day would be April 11.

4/4/2014

In addition to four other school renovations totaling over $116 million, Lowell's school board voted to make the proposed $245.4 million addition and renovation of Lowell High School its priority building project. The city is submitting funding requests for all five projects to the Massachusetts School Building Authority for potential reimbursement.

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