K12 Headlines

11/13/2013

11/13/2013

Eighteen states have made cyberbullying a crime, and every state except Montana has passed anti-bullying legislation. Most schools have developed policies in line with those laws as about half of young people report having been harassed online, according to the Cyberbullying Research Center.

11/13/2013

A bank in Albuquerque, N.M., had a limited budget to make one of its branches more environmentally sustainable, so students at the local Architecture, Construction, and Engineering Leadership High School rolled up their sleeves and went to work. They searched websites for green design options, consulted with an engineer, and used spreadsheets to compare potential costs and energy savings.

11/13/2013

Join Glenn Pethel, executive director of leadership development for Gwinnett County (GA) Public Schools, for a free webinar sponsored by The Wallace Foundation and the National Association of Secondary School Principals that will examine how six urban school districts are working to cultivate first-rate principals for their schools.

11/13/2013

Even controlling for income, achievement gaps between black and white students and Hispanic and white students persist, evidenced by a recent analysis of standardized test results in Ohio. In that study, poor white kids outperformed black kids from both poor and wealthy families.

11/13/2013

Some classrooms in Minneapolis’ most struggling schools could soon have two teachers as the district turns to drastic steps to boost achievement in the wake of a new report showing academic results for minority students continue to lag.

11/13/2013

School officials are anecdotally reporting an increase in marijuana-related incidents in middle and high schools after the 2010 regulation of medical marijuana dispensaries and the 2012 vote to legalize recreational marijuana.

11/13/2013

Spokane School District took its high school dropout rate from 33 percent to 20 percent in two years by building early-detection reports with Tableau. Learn how it put timely, actionable information in front of its teachers and administrators that helped steer high-risk students back onto the right path.

11/13/2013

Students entering the Western New York Tech Academy next fall will leave high school four years later with both a free two-year college degree and the prospect of a good paying job in their field.

11/13/2013

A Bay Area technology company has unveiled a gunshot detection system for schools that it hopes will help police respond faster to mass shootings and smaller incidents, but privacy advocates are concerned about surveillance.

11/13/2013

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is trying to do what Khan Academy, MIT OpenCourseWare, iTunes U, and even Phet Interactive Simulations cannot—let students interact with a real physical experiment.

11/13/2013

In his recent book, Transformation Education, Ron Packard says that brick-and-mortar schools will still exist, but individualized learning will be at the center, with engaging interactive content rather than a series of chalk-and-textbook, grade-delineated classrooms.

11/13/2013

The Center for Copyright Information—backed by copyright groups like the Motion Picture Association of America and the Recording Industry Association of America, among others—is currently developing a curriculum in California to teach elementary schoolers the value of copyrights and the dangers of piracy.

11/13/2013

The Tuscaloosa Board of Education unanimously approved Dennis Duncan as the Alabama system’s new director of career technical education. Duncan has been with the Bibb County School System since 2004, having served as a principal and director of career and technical education.

11/13/2013

If the United States is to prepare its students for success in the modern technology-driven world, more classrooms—in both Rhode Island and the whole nation—need to embrace higher learning outcomes for students made possible by integrating modern technology and quality teaching to create robust digital learning.

11/13/2013

Educators at Beverley Elementary School in Plano, Texas, are using technology to feed students’ natural curiosity and help them overcome challenges, such as fear of speaking in class.

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