Daily News

12/17/2012

12/17/2012

One dressed up in goofy costumes to make her students smile.

12/17/2012

Across the country, education reform is drawing big ideas and big bucks from some big names.

12/17/2012

Indiana’s new schools superintendent, Glenda Ritz, is making some allies in the Statehouse: Republican legislators who pushed the education-reform laws that triggered a wave of voter discontent that carried the Democrat Ritz into her new job.

12/17/2012

At Whitson Elementary School, Laura Austin’s class of eight first graders sat in two groups of four Friday morning, each student huddled behind a makeshift screen of manila folders, waiting for a spelling test.

12/17/2012

Gov. Rick Perry had called it “foolish and irresponsible” for Texas to apply for funds from the Obama administration’s signature education initiative. He feared Race to the Top funding would come with too many federal mandates on how to run classrooms in his state.

12/17/2012

If turnout at a charter school conference held Saturday in Tacoma is any measure, there’s definitely some interest in the independently managed, publicly financed schools that were approved by voters in November.

12/17/2012

A worker who turned on the intercom, alerting others in the building that something was very wrong. A custodian who risked his life by running through the halls warning of danger. A clerk who led 18 children on their hands and knees to safety, then gave them paper and crayons to keep them calm and quiet.

12/17/2012

In the wake of the Newtown, Conn., mass shooting that claimed 26 lives Friday, former Education Secretary Bill Bennett said Sunday that schools should possibly consider arming certain employees to prevent attacks.

12/17/2012

Kateria Barnes was two weeks into her freshman year at New York University when she began to feel anxious and overwhelmed. There was so much to do: navigate a new city, register for classes, find classrooms, buy books.

12/14/2012

12/14/2012

In a battle over healthier school lunches that pitted the Obama administration against school children, chalk up a point for the kids. Students have been complaining that some of their favorite foods were taken off the plate because of the Obama administration's efforts to make school lunches healthier. Last week, the administration reversed some of the new school lunch rules, and the kids are happy again, says Dave Porter, superintendent of Wallace County, Kansas, schools.

12/14/2012

The House of Representatives is expected to approve legislation to create a new school report card and accountability system that supporters hope will help improve student learning. “It is fitting that one of the final items we will deal with in this 129th General Assembly deals with legislation that will significantly advance the quality of education in our state,” Sen. Peggy Lehner, R-Kettering, told colleagues yesterday before the Senate approved its version of House Bill 555 by a vote of 27-6.

12/14/2012

Health officials say students at Butler High School in east Georgia will continue to be tested for tuberculosis after the holidays as a precaution. Tammy Burdeaux, a nursing and clinical director with the East Central Health District, says officials will re-examine students who returned negative skin tests for tuberculosis bacteria during the initial rounds of testing.

12/14/2012

Philadelphia's Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. announced the proposed closures of 37 school buildings, plus multiple other changes to the cash-poor Philadelphia School District. He is proposing the buildings listed for closure, around 20 elementary schools, a handful of middle schools, and about 10 high schools, shut their doors in June, according to sources and documents obtained by The Inquirer. The schools are in nearly every part of the city and include well-known ones with long histories.

12/14/2012

On December 11, 2012, the Education Department announced the 16 winners of the Race to the Top school district grants (RTTD). Sixty-one finalists had been announced recently out of an original 372 districts that turned in applications in November. A total of $400 million was due to go out, and winners ranged from $10 million to $40 million for a period of four years, depending on the population of the given district. The winners included urban and rural districts, small districts and large consortia, and public and charter schools.

12/14/2012

Just five weeks after voters ousted him from office, Tony Bennett already has a new gig. The trailblazing but controversial Indiana schools chief, a key force in implementing Gov. Mitch Daniels' broad education reform agenda, was named Florida's education commissioner Wednesday. A hero in the education reform movement and a villain to teachers unions, Mr. Bennett was hailed by Florida Gov. Rick Scott for his "great track record of achievement in Indiana."

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