K12 Headlines

5/15/2014

5/15/2014

The Missouri Senate passed a fix to the problem-plagued school transfer law. The bill allows students in St. Louis, St. Louis County, adjoining counties and Jackson County to transfer to private, non-religious schools, only if approved by local vote.

5/15/2014

Goalbook has expanded its web-based platform, Toolkit, to include research-based resources that allow teachers to better address social emotional learning (SEL) in the classroom.

5/15/2014

Less money coming in to Duval County Schools means about 65 school security guards could be out of a job. Incidents at school, the crime rate in the area, and the makeup of the campus will be taken into consideration when allocating the more than 100 guards left.

5/15/2014

The Indiana Department of Education is expanding a program which will help the children of migrant workers. The main goal is for the children to stay with their parents while they travel for work and not fall behind in school. The credits will transfer when they return.

5/15/2014

The state last year flagged 17 schools whose statewide assessment scores were inconsistent with data prediction models and raised questions about potential cheating. The schools had performed better than expected based on individual, classwide or school test results.

5/15/2014

While many of these parents’ concerns may be valid about school athletics and communciations, it is disappointing that the Buffalo community hasn’t shown similar levels of outrage for matters that actually affect young people’s learning and future academic careers. We are placing sports above academics.

5/15/2014

Petworth's Roosevelt High in Washington, D.C. could see a major transformation soon under a new proposal to turn it into a international relations-focused school. The school will include CTE programs in international business, finance and international culinary arts as well as early college prep courses.

5/15/2014

Progress toward integrating America's schools since the landmark Brown v. Topeka Board of Education decision 60 years ago is being chipped away, and it's no longer just a black-and-white issue.

5/15/2014

By providing the funding that Pennsylvania schools need for instruction and to maintain buildings that are conducive for learning, state leaders can turn election-year optimism into meaningful actions that would benefit all communities.

5/15/2014

A bill to require sex education for public school students that would include information about contraceptives was voted down. Current law allows schools to teach sex education to students in seventh through 12th grades. The proposed bill would have mandated sex education and started it in fourth grade.

5/15/2014

The Maryland Board of Public Works has approved an additional $131 million in unallocated funding for school construction funding. That brings the total amount of school construction funding in the state for the next fiscal year to $325.3 million.

5/15/2014

It took three attempts, but voters in Wayne County have approved an $18 million school construction bond — a key component in a larger $42 million package. That package includes the construction of two new elementary schools and additions and renovations to the local high school.

5/15/2014

Whenever an anniversary of a major milestone is celebrated, some might ask what changed since the last one. So it is with the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education case. One of the important lessons of the case and its successor is that people matter.

5/14/2014

5/14/2014

The movement toward exposing students to career and technical education at a younger age is gaining steam. In one central Ohio district, the Tolles Career & Technical Center and Jonathan Alder school district are teaming up to offer junior high school pre-engineering technology and IT classes.

5/14/2014

Developers are getting mountains of cash to create digital tools for the classroom and teachers are eager to incorporate technology into their lesson plans. But school districts only have so much money to spend and teachers only have so much time to discover and learn how to use new software, raising questions about whether an ed-tech bubble is forming.

Pages