K12 Headlines

3/27/2014

3/27/2014

Lawmakers resurrected a bill that would allow more charter schools in underperforming districts but did not address reimbursement increases to traditional public schools.

3/27/2014

A Tennessee bill that would issue vouchers for private school tuition to up to 5,000 low-income students this fall and to as many as 20,000 students in 2017 passed through the Senate Education Committee.

3/27/2014

The Madison School Board is weighing whether to implement a new student discipline policy across the district next school year or to try it out as a pilot program first for a year in 11 schools with higher numbers of reported behavioral problems.

3/27/2014

The nation's most segregated schools aren't in the deep south–they're in New York, according to a report released by the University of California, Los Angeles' Civil Rights Project. In particular, 19 out of New York City's 32 Community School Districts had 10 percent or fewer white students in 2010.

3/27/2014

The governor signed into law a measure to allow adults to keep guns locked in their vehicles in school parking lots. Current Indiana law can make it a felony for legal gun permit holders to even inadvertently have their guns in their vehicles while they drop off their children at school.

3/26/2014

3/26/2014

Overall, the type of learning management system (LMS) that instructors prefer may largely depend on course content, structure and subject matter. Moodle, Course Toolkit, EDU 2.0, JoomlaLMS, and ATutor are versatile systems that give educators many options for how to handle important aspects of teaching.

3/26/2014

Brandi-Lyn Mendham will become Zeeland Public Schools' new director of curriculum and technology on May 1. The position is a blend of two vacated positions. Mendham currently works for the West Shore Education Services District.

3/26/2014

Thomas Baileys replaces Vincent Nallo, who retired in December, as the new administrative director of Career Technology Center of Lackawanna County. He faces a school with declining enrollment and takes over in the middle of an $18 million renovation project.

3/26/2014

A year from now, Washington students will take the latest round of standardized tests on a computer. A lot of students will log into several devices all at the same time, within a short window, taking up significant chunks of their district’s bandwidth. As the state transitions to the new technology-based tests, districts are preparing their technological infrastructures—namely computers and Internet capacity.

3/26/2014

District 214 Director of Technology Keith Bockwoldt has received the Consortium for School Networking’s 2014 Withrow National CTO Award. Bockwoldt designed the district's Educational Technology Replacement and Initiative Program and introduced a 1-to-1 program featuring 5,000 iPads for student use.

3/26/2014

When planning the implementation of a huge technology initiative, where audio enhancement and camera technologies would be placed in 552 classrooms in one summer, the key to success was rethinking how we deliver professional learning.

3/26/2014

The wireless networks at six Alabama high schools are now humming at full power after administrators figured out how to prevent a new wave of new smartphones, tablets and other devices from overwhelming bandwidth capacity.

3/26/2014

A carnival with a twist is coming to the West coast this spring. Students will navigate a laser maze and measure their strength in volts—all while learning engineering skills. The STEAM Carnival was created by Two Bit Circus, a Los Angeles-based engineering and entertainment company that creates high-tech games.

3/26/2014

Indiana's Fairfield district is planning on restructuring its schools to use the STEAM model for all grades starting in 2015. Elementary schools would see the biggest change, with two schools focusing on STEAM and a third on practical arts. Parents will be able to choose what learning model would be best for their child.

3/26/2014

To bring the technology infrastructure of Hamilton County Schools up to speed, school officials say they must spend millions more annually to hire new teachers, administrators and technicians. A new three-year plan calls for eventually spending nearly $4 million more a year above the costs of new devices.

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