K12 Headlines

5/21/2015

5/21/2015

After Gov. Chris Christie imposed a cap on superintendent salaries in 2010, the savings — only about $10 million a year — were really a drop in the bucket. This coming school year, many more superintendents will see their contracts expire. The state Senate voted to lift the cap, before it drives more superintendents to other states. Let's hope the Assembly does the same.

5/21/2015

The Massachusetts city will operate 11 percent of its bus fleet with Blue Bird propane autogas buses, starting with the 2015-16 school year. The school district is purchasing 86 Blue Bird Propane Vision school buses, and hopes to convert more of their diesel fleet to propane buses in the future.

5/21/2015

Northwest Evaluation Association and the Colorado League of Charter Schools signed a new strategic partnership to provide resources including the MAP assessment, MAP for Primary Grades, Children’s Progress Academic Assessment, MAP Science Assessments and Virtual Comparison Group data at discounted rates to the league's members.

5/21/2015

Since the 1990s, suicide rates among elementary-age black children have nearly doubled, while suicide rates among white children have fallen, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

5/21/2015

Major items in the Texas district's proposal include a new elementary school, a science and technology center for Allen High School, and a new building to replace the facility housing the freshman campus.

5/21/2015

U.S. public schools beefed up security measures with safety drills and parent notification systems in the years surrounding the massacre at Connecticut's Sandy Hook Elementary School, according to a new government survey.

5/21/2015

Going greener is the focus at Waterbury’s Kaynor Tech, where students are building another “e-house”. The project is part of the nation’s first “green” construction learning laboratories for high school students. The kids are focusing on a clean energy curriculum, learning all about the latest technologies in the field.

5/20/2015

5/20/2015

The next step for education technology is to foster and enhance memorable moments with educators, get teens excited to learn, and make students feel invested in their education anew. With time, there will only be more technology saturation, more tech-literate kids, and more opportunities to use tech in the classroom.

5/20/2015

Code.org is teaming up with The College Board to push for more computer science courses in U.S. high schools and to increase the number of female and minority students taking those courses. Curriculums, tools, training and funding will be provided to school districts that qualify.

5/20/2015

With 63 percent of public schools not having access to broadband speeds needed for digital learning, administering the new standardized tests to students online has revealed a large tech divide in the nation's classrooms. In rural and low-income districts, only 14 percent meet high-speed internet targets.

5/20/2015

While the Leavenworth High School yearbook is still a printed product, readers can watch several videos while looking through this year's publication. Using the Aurasma app, readers can use their smartphones or other devices to watch videos that are linked to photographs in the yearbook.

5/20/2015

McClymonds and Oakland Technical high schools will share a $5 million Intel grant over five years to develop computer science and engineering curriculums, buy computers, train teachers and offer employee mentors and job shadowing programs.

5/20/2015

There is a way to bridge the gap between the technology-savvy and the technology-challenged. InfoSnap developed a school and district's guide to achieving active family participation in under-served and low-income areas when implementing an online enrollment and registration solution.

5/20/2015

Schools that banned students from carrying smartphones saw a 6.4 percent increase in test scores. The impact on underachieving students was much more significant with their average test scores rising by 14 percent, according to a study of 91 schools in England by the London School of Economics.

5/20/2015

A new wave of applications connects teachers with mobile access to professional development and expands opportunities for collaboration with mentors and peers. Some apps allow teachers to videotape themselves so they can get instant peer feedback while others can save districts money on travel costs.

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