K12 Headlines

4/20/2015

4/20/2015

The Crescent Leadership Academy is one of just three schools set up to deal with problem kids, and before its current principal arrived, it was widely known as a weak link. A local nonprofit alleged the school was little more than a way station on the school-to-prison pipeline.

4/20/2015

Drawp for School has been released in the Chrome Web Store. Also available on theiTunes App Store and Google Play, Drawp for School is a creation app with a built-in collaboration platform and automatic distribution, collection and storage of assignments in the proprietary Drawp cloud.

4/20/2015

The newly launched Kart Kingdom is a collection of curriculum-based games that help children ages 6-9 learn systems-thinking skills collaboratively. The PBS KIDS game also features a new junior edition of E-line Media’s Gamestar Mechanic, which allows students to create, play and share their own digital games.

4/20/2015

Dianna Wentzell spent nine years teaching social studies or writing in public schools, two years teaching world history at a magnet school, and one year teaching various subjects in Pakistan. Those are qualifications Gov. Dannel Malloy's first controversial commissioner did not have.

4/20/2015

A web-based cyberethics module for grades 3 through 6 has been released by Intel Security and Discovery Education as part of the Intel Security Digital Safety Program. Students will learn how to act more responsibly online and explore concepts such as cyberbullying, plagiarism and positive digital footprints.

4/20/2015

Chicago Public Schools chief Barbara Byrd-Bennett is taking a paid leave of absence in the face of a federal investigation that subpoenas show is taking a broad approach in its search for information about the district's decision to award a $20.5 million no-bid contract.

4/20/2015

The Every Child Succeeds Act—a bipartisan education bill to replace the controversial No Child Left Behind law and reduce the federal government's power over schools—cleared its first big hurdle last week.

4/17/2015

4/17/2015

The enhanced MimioProjector 280 line from Mimio now offers educators three options: the conventional non-interactive 280 model, the pen-based interactive 280I model and the new touch-enabled 280T model. The 280I allows for the simultaneous use of up to 10 simultaneous touch points.

4/17/2015

FLIR Systems, Inc.'s new FLIR TCX thermal mini bullet camera is now available. The security camera combines 24/7 high-contrast thermal video and high-performance built-in video motion detection.

4/17/2015

Six schools want special permission from the state to hire teachers not certified in the subject they're teaching. It's one of the ideas the Coalition of Innovative School Districts thinks will improve Kansas schools.

4/17/2015

The Ann Arbor Public Schools Board of Education voted to ban dangerous weapons, including guns, from school buildings and property. Under a new policy, a weapon such as a gun in a school constitutes an emergency.

4/17/2015

E-cigarette use among high school students increased from 4.5 percent in 2013 to 13.4 percent in 2014. Among middle school students, the rate rose from 1.1. percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014. The 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey also found that e-cigarette use has surpassed that of every other tobacco product.

4/17/2015

WIN Learning, developers of the WIN Career Readiness System, and Nepris, a cloud-based platform connecting STEAM professionals with teachers and their students, have entered into a strategic partnership. The first stage will focus on connecting teachers who are using the recently launched WIN Math program with Nepris’ industry professionals.

4/17/2015

Gov. Steve Bullock awarded several Montana schools a special grant to help expand school breakfast programs. Nearly $60,000 in privately funded grants was given to 16 schools across the state. The funds are provided to help schools pay for equipment such as carts and kiosks.

4/17/2015

Charter school lotteries are fixed. Even when operators entice lottery participation, voluntary entry skews the composition of charter populations. Charter lotteries should instead include every student within a district or zone. Such a fix would maintain the power of school choice while providing all the opportunity to make that choice.

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