DA Daily

Montclair, N.J., district appoints attorney to investigate unauthorized assessments release

At a special public board meeting last Friday, the Montclair, N.J., Board of Ed unanimously voted to appoint attorney Mark Tabakin to conduct an investigation into the suspected unauthorized release of proprietary/confidential district assessments. The resolution also calls for Tabakin to investigate other incidents of conduct that may be contrary to the Board’s best interest, as may be disclosed by further investigation.

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Oklahoma Gov. Fallin visits New Mexico for education summit

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin will participate in a New Mexico summit next week to discuss connecting education with the workforce. Next Monday, Fallin will join New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, Utah Gov. Gary Herbert, and American Samoa Gov. Lolo Matalasi Moliga to discuss improving education and workforce training and ways to align them with the needs of individual state economies.

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New Paltz, N.Y. event will ponder future of Ulster County education

It's not just that New York wants schools to consolidate. In the face of declining enrollment, soaring costs, plummeting revenue and school aid, New York school districts seem to be left with few other options. As school districts and teachers try to plan ahead, many have wondered out loud what the future of education will look like for our kids.

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Latina leaders: On a mission to improve education standards in the U.S.

Sara Martinez Tucker started out in the world of journalism and then distinguished herself in the world of business. But it is the world of education in which she has found her passion.

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Louisiana study highlights importance of early childhood education

As Louisiana begins to make early childhood education a priority, a new study stresses the importance of high-quality preschool programs and health-care coverage for a child's future success.

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Charter-school education gambles with our children

Just 10 days into a new academic year, classes were abruptly over at one North Carolina charter school this year. In September, parents who had enrolled their children in Kinston Charter Academy received a letter from the principal directing them to take their children someplace else.

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City Council, BoE seek end to revenue strain on Pittsburgh schools

In 2004, as part of a raft of legislation to rescue Pittsburgh from near bankruptcy, the state legislature transferred a portion of a tax levied by the Pittsburgh Board of Public Education to the city. At the time, the school district seemed to be on firm financial footing with a healthy reserve fund of around $90 million. The city, on the other hand, was sinking into financial distress and facing a $77 million hole in its budget. But now the financial portrait of both bodies has changed—even reversed, some say.

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In Florida, agreement to reduce student arrests

One of the nation's largest school districts, law enforcement and the NAACP have reached a deal aimed at arresting fewer students for minor offenses and cutting down the so-called school-to-prison pipeline, which the civil rights group and others say disproportionately affects minority students.

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Colorado is asking taxpayers for $1 billion to help schools

In one poor school district in Colorado’s San Luis Valley, students take classes in a bus garage, using plastic sheeting to keep the diesel fumes at bay. In another, there is no more money to tutor young immigrants struggling to read. And just south of Denver, a district where one in four kindergartners is homeless has cut 10 staff positions and is bracing for another cull.

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Minority student population in Illinois surpassing white students

With Illinois public schools on the cusp of becoming a "majority minority," suburban districts that were once overwhelmingly white are adjusting to their rising Latino enrollment with changes in curriculum and culture.

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