DA Daily

California district installs surveillance cameras

Forty-eight surveillance cameras costing $120,000 went into service at four Novato, Calif. schools yesterday, a growing trend among schools across the Bay Area. Novato’s superintendent told the Marin Independent Journal that part of the reason for installing the cameras is to secure schools, discourage the damaging of school property, and keep kids safe.

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A new group is pushing for S.C. education reforms

There’s a sheriff in North Carolina. Who works for a colonel in Oklahoma. Who works for a billionaire in Oregon. These are the leaders of a new group that’s looking to enact a host of education reforms in South Carolina—although all they’ve done so far is publish a cookie cutter catalog aimed at alerting parents to existing school choice options.

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Report shows education disparity among nation’s third-graders

A new report raises alarms about whether America’s 8-year-olds are prepared for success. Only 36 percent of third-graders in the U.S. score at or above the national average in math, reading, and science, according to the report, which also exposes the income and racial divide in America. White children from higher-income families score significantly higher than other children on these tests.

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Montclair, N.J., district appoints attorney to investigate unauthorized assessments release

At a special public board meeting last Friday, the Montclair, N.J., Board of Ed unanimously voted to appoint attorney Mark Tabakin to conduct an investigation into the suspected unauthorized release of proprietary/confidential district assessments. The resolution also calls for Tabakin to investigate other incidents of conduct that may be contrary to the Board’s best interest, as may be disclosed by further investigation.

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Oklahoma Gov. Fallin visits New Mexico for education summit

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin will participate in a New Mexico summit next week to discuss connecting education with the workforce. Next Monday, Fallin will join New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, Utah Gov. Gary Herbert, and American Samoa Gov. Lolo Matalasi Moliga to discuss improving education and workforce training and ways to align them with the needs of individual state economies.

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New Paltz, N.Y. event will ponder future of Ulster County education

It's not just that New York wants schools to consolidate. In the face of declining enrollment, soaring costs, plummeting revenue and school aid, New York school districts seem to be left with few other options. As school districts and teachers try to plan ahead, many have wondered out loud what the future of education will look like for our kids.

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Latina leaders: On a mission to improve education standards in the U.S.

Sara Martinez Tucker started out in the world of journalism and then distinguished herself in the world of business. But it is the world of education in which she has found her passion.

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Louisiana study highlights importance of early childhood education

As Louisiana begins to make early childhood education a priority, a new study stresses the importance of high-quality preschool programs and health-care coverage for a child's future success.

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Charter-school education gambles with our children

Just 10 days into a new academic year, classes were abruptly over at one North Carolina charter school this year. In September, parents who had enrolled their children in Kinston Charter Academy received a letter from the principal directing them to take their children someplace else.

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City Council, BoE seek end to revenue strain on Pittsburgh schools

In 2004, as part of a raft of legislation to rescue Pittsburgh from near bankruptcy, the state legislature transferred a portion of a tax levied by the Pittsburgh Board of Public Education to the city. At the time, the school district seemed to be on firm financial footing with a healthy reserve fund of around $90 million. The city, on the other hand, was sinking into financial distress and facing a $77 million hole in its budget. But now the financial portrait of both bodies has changed—even reversed, some say.

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