21st-century learning

Are schools doing too much for kids and none of it well?

American schools are unique in the time, energy and money devoted to non-classroom activities.

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Tech titan's high-grade gift to San Francisco middle schools

Some months ago, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and schools Superintendent Richard Carranza met with Salesforce.com founder Marc Benioff to ask the tech titan for some financial support to boost access to technology in the city's 12 middle schools. It was a gutsy plea—enough to buy hundreds of iPads, provide wireless access in classrooms, and leave enough extra to train teachers to use all of it well.

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ANGELA PASCOPELLA's picture

Mayor's Youth Council launches mindfulness campaign in Minnesota district

Campaign introduces mindfulness to students, or the intentional thought of how actions may affect ourselves and others and the ability to evaluate our choices.

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Education 3.0: Embracing technology to ‘jump the curve’

It may not be as exciting as “The Winds of War” or “Sharknado,” but I would argue that the role of ed tech in Education 3.0 is far more important than anything Hollywood has produced.

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Building schools designed to succeed includes technology

More than three-quarters of U.S. schools are in need of repairs. The federal government is proposing to respond to that need by investing millions of dollars in school construction and modernization. But those dollars must be spent wisely. The schools of yesteryear, with their rows of desks and stair-stepped lecture halls, simply don't work for the students of today.

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Video game Minecraft is an obsession and an educational tool

The video game Minecraft is about building, exploration, creativity, and even collaboration. Around the world, Minecraft is being used to educate children on everything from science to city planning to speaking a new language. Should U.S. schools be paying closer attention?

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New Jersey high school hands out Samsung Chromebooks

After the installation of a $45,000 wireless infrastructure, Marist High School in New Jersey gave each student a Samsung Series 3 Chromebook. Now, by accessing the school's network through their laptop, students can take notes, read textbooks, and study for tests online.

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Change Agents: The Menlo App Academy wants kids to code

Matt Dillabough and Max Colbert, the two 14-year-olds behind the Menlo App Academy, have a mission to teach the USA to code. And that could fill a growing need for U.S. employers.

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