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21st-century learning

With California’s adoption of the Common Core State Standards, it became apparent that all students in Placentia-Yorba Linda USD in Orange County needed better keyboarding, higher order thinking and information fluency skills in order to perform well on the Smarter Balanced assessment.

Kimberly Moritz is in her seventh year as the superintendent of Randolph Central School District. Prior to leading the district of 977 K12 students in this rural community in western New York, Moritz worked as a teacher for ten years in a neighboring rural school district and as a principal in two other school districts. Moritz joined Randolph with the goal of raising the district’s historically average student achievement; for over a decade, Randolph was seeing mediocre results on state assessments.

The 9,000-student Council Bluffs Community School District in Iowa was one of the first K12 districts in the country to use Chromebooks and Google Apps for Education in a 1-to-1 implementation, beginning in 2011. The district has seen improved student achievement, rising graduation rates and decreasing dropout rates, with some of the most significant improvement in the state.

ince its inception in 2001, the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) has required internet content filtering to keep students safe online. Policymakers amended CIPA in 2008, requiring that students also be educated on internet safety. In addition to providing this required online safety training, schools must show evidence that training has occurred. With the new requirement taking effect for the 2012 school year, school administrators in many Ohio districts expressed their anxiety about meeting the new standards and retaining their E-Rate funding to state education officials.

At one large suburban school system in Westchester County, New York, an online assessment tool first used to comply with state law is now the foundation for a district-wide technology program that’s preparing students for life beyond their school days. Christine Coleman, director of technology for the City School District of New Rochelle, introduced TechLiteracy Assessments from several years ago to determine how well eighth grade students had grasped lessons on cyberbullying and internet safety.

Today’s students must be able to use digital tools as they develop critical thinking, problem solving and other 21st century skills. Administrators are tasked with the challenge of selecting the right technology resources that incorporate the development of these skills into the classroom. This web seminar, originally broadcast on September 23, 2014, featured an expert on 21st century learning, who discussed the importance of equipping students with 21st century skills and practical ways for integrating those skills into teaching.

The innovative new facilities, unique classroom design and 1-to-1 technology program at Bridgeport Public Schools integrate to transform learning at the system level.


The Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) has been California’s most improved urban school district for the past eight years. A key part of the district’s improvement plan has been a personalized learning vision that utilizes technology, including providing all students with access to a reliable wireless device.  As part of this personalized learning initiative, the district has deployed Google Apps for Education accounts for all 48,000 K12 students and over 10,000 Chromebooks for grades 3 through 12.

Administrators at Greenwich Public Schools, in southwestern Connecticut, had been looking for a content management system that would bring all their existing online tools together for their instructional staff and 8,500 students. They also wanted to provide new online tools to their youngest students to help them develop digital literacy skills. “About two or three years ago, we realized we had many overlapping functions in learning systems, which was creating a lot of redundancies,” says Phillip Dunn, director of digital learning and technology.

Developing 21st-century skills are essential for today’s students to meet state standards, perform on assessments, and be college and career ready. When a project-based approach is used, educators can incorporate 21st-century skills into everyday teaching and learning. These digital skills also help to improve the critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity of students. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on March 5, 2014, experts from discussed best practices for developing these skills in the classroom.