You are here

collective bargaining

Above, the Metropolitan School District of Warren Township discusses union issues. Left to right, Chad Hunter, Uniserv director; Kate Miller, union president; Dena Cushenberry, superintendent; Brian Simkins, human resources director; and Tony Mendez, school board president.
The Central York School District administrators recently discussed union issues. From left to right, Shelly Eaton, teacher union president; Bobbi Billman, director of human resources; Kevin Youcheff, principal of North Hills Elementary School; and Robert Grove, assistant superintendent.

It was compromise that prevented a major teacher’s strike in February, as Portland Public Schools and the local union struck a bargain during an intense 24 hours of negotiating that ended months of deliberations.

This is an updated version of the interview posted on the District Administration website at the time of the strike.

Longtime school superintendent Randall Collins, executive director of the District Administration Leadership Institute (, shares professional insights on the Chicago teacher strike with Odvard Egil Dyrli, District Administration’s executive editor.

American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten

About 12 percent of charter schools in the United States have collective bargaining agreements with their unions, either by a state mandate or as part of an individual school’s mission. These union contracts—the first generation of such agreements—generally include unique innovations and are more streamlined, according to a new study by the University of Washington’s Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE). Released on Dec.

On March 9, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill that ended collective bargaining rights for public sector employees and thus reversed an era of organized labor in the state. But it didn't stop there. Other states--Indiana, Idaho, Tennessee, and Oklahoma, to name a few--jumped on the bargaining rights bandwagon proposing and, in many cases, passing similar provisions. It's no wonder, then, why the appointment of Paul Kreutzer, a Wisconsin superintendent who was an outspoken supporter of Gov.

District administrators in Wisconsin would appreciate greater management leeway in negotiations with teachers' unions, but many say the collective bargaining restrictions crafted by Gov. Scott Walker and the republican-controlled legislature go too far. On March 9, the GOP senators of Wisconsin abruptly passed a stripped down version of the budget repair bill. The financial proposals were eliminated, although they kept the language ending many of the collective bargaining rights for public sector employees.