You are here


Ask any random college educated American adult to recall the processes of cell respiration so painstakingly memorized in freshman biology, or to rehearse the dates of the Progressive Era that had been absorbed as part of the standard American history survey course, and you're likely to receive a blank stare, proving something that cognitive scientists have been shouting from the rooftops: Coursework focused on memorization of a broad body of content knowledge will not produce the sort of learning that lasts.

In May, the Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) will hold a final vote on a new social studies curriculum to be used for the next seven to 10 years by Texas' 4.7 million K12 students. Because its textbooks are standardized at the state level rather than by individual school districts, Texas has the second-largest market in the nation, and publishers scramble to get their books chosen. The high cost of creating different editions for other states prevents publishers from forming alternate editions; thus, Texas' standards are often replicated for use in other states.