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Daniel Mahoney is vice president of risk control for Glatfelter Public Practice, a public entity specialist providing risk management services and insurance products to schools.

Medical emergencies can happen in any school at any time. They can be the result of pre-existing health problems, accidents, violence, unintentional actions, natural disasters and toxins. Premature deaths in schools from sudden cardiac arrest, blunt trauma to the chest, gunshot wounds, asthma, head injuries, drug overdose, allergic reactions and heat stroke have been reported.

No school is immune. Every school faces risks of harm, loss and vulnerabilities in their operations, with their staff and students, or against their facilities. The daunting task faced by administrators lies in knowing how to identify and proactively manage those risks to ensure the safety and security of staff, minimize the disruption to school or district operations, and mitigate the negative impact when adverse incidents occur.

Ident-A-Kid’s Complete Campus Security System (CCSS) is a free, visitor-management program that signs in and prints name badges for all visitors, and documents the lengths and reasons for their visits. Tardy and early-dismissal students also can be recorded. Its new messaging system, ParentAlert, can notify parents of any emergency.


This compilation of school safety tools includes training courses, procedures, and checklists for programs like accident management and compliance. School districts also can add their own tools and content. The management system needed to operate a district’s safety program is included.


A bookkeeper’s calm demeanor in talking down an armed intruder saved her suburban Atlanta school from experiencing another potential Sandy Hook tragedy on Aug. 20.

In 11 states, scores for school climate are becoming as important as those for math and reading, thanks to a new score card that allows administrators to learn where they need to improve school safety, student engagement, and overall learning environment.

After the Newtown tragedy last December, an outpouring of gifts from around the world inspired Sandy Hook Elementary School first grade teacher Kaitlin Roig. She created a new social curriculum that teaches students about compassion, kindness, and caring for others—an antidote of sorts for the hatred and pain inflicted upon their school children, their families, and their community.

Newtown Public Schools Superintendent Janet Robinson gives a news briefing last January about Monroe’s Chalk Hill School, where the Sandy Hook Elementary School children are continuing their education this school year.

Last December, the small town of Newtown, Conn., was forever changed. The students, staff, parents, and community members of Newtown (Conn.) Public Schools were traumatized on Dec. 14, 2012, when lone gunman and former student Adam Lanza shot and killed 20 children and six staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

As the use of social media and mobile technology has grown at an exponential rate, so has the problem of bullying. To address this issue and keep up with federal and state anti-bullying mandates, administrators need a solution that utilizes student “insider” knowledge to prevent campus violence, drug use, and more. This web seminar, originally broadcast on January 24, 2013, addressed how crime reporting tools can be used to address these problems, as well as how to push user adoption and measure progress.

In the months following the Sandy Hook massacre, schools nationwide stepped up efforts to provide safe environments for teachers and students, and many turned to high-tech solutions.