science

Get ready for NextGen Science

Recognizing that American K12 students have fallen behind foreign students in their grasp of scientific principles, educators have devised a new set of teaching guidelines that will radically change the way science is taught in classrooms across the United States—including recommendations that climate change and evolution be taught as core elements of scientific knowledge.

Get ready for NextGen science

Educators have devised Next Generation Science Standards that will radically change the way science is taught in classrooms. A key to fulfilling the promise of NGSS will be training teachers to adapt.

Bringing Science to Rural Classrooms

Get Ready for NextGen Science

New national standards promise to revolutionize the content area.

Critics don't give New York science schools enough credit

The best American K12 schools, many of them in the New York City metro area, are fully competitive with their peers around the world, even in math and science—though experts often tell us otherwise.

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Wisconsin Students Are Living and Learning Science

This school year, students from P.J. Jacobs Junior High School in Stevens Point, Wis., joined 335 students who are part of MySciLife, using technology to literally "live" as a science concept—such as trying to be a cell, a rock, or an animal—and interact with other students from 15 classrooms in seven states across the United States.

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The Next Generation Science Standards

The Next Generation Science Standards, based on the Framework for K12 Science Education developed by the National Research Council, are now available. Download a printer-friendly version here or click on the videos to learn more. An interactive version will be available soon.

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Taking STEM to the Jungle

National Science Teachers Association 2013 National Conference

Thursday, April 11, 2013 to Sunday, April 14, 2013

San Antonio, Texas

Kansas Board of Ed to Revisit Decline in Science Education

The Kansas State Board of Education is expected to take another look next month at a research report showing many elementary teachers have cut back or eliminated the time they spend teaching science, even though they still post science grades on student report cards.

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