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superintendents

Since 2011, Superintendent Elizabeth Celania Fagen has helped shift Douglas County Schools from a good district to a great one.

In the last year, the Douglas County School District in suburban Denver has been called a national model by former U.S. secretary of education William J. Bennett and “the most interesting school district in America” by the American Enterprise Institute.

Test scores and graduation rates have risen steadily since Alberto Carvalho became Miami-Dade's superintendent in 2008.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho was named 2014 National Superintendent of the Year by the School Superintendents Association. Since he took the job in 2008, the district’s test scores and graduation rates have risen steadily. The district has also won awards for marked improvement in AP participation and performance.

Jason E. Glass is superintendent and chief learner at Eagle County Schools in Colorado.

All across the country, discussions around improving educator effectiveness and evaluation have become synonymous. Forces from state houses and federal agencies compel us to engage in the work of redesigning evaluation systems and to devise ways of using student outcomes as a significant part of that effort.

Superintendents and the evaluations they use are coming directly into the crosshairs.

Superintendent Art Fessler pursued creating the 21st Century Leadership Academy for his Illinois district administrators when he started working last summer. 

An instructor in a classroom addresses the students. “We’re going to discuss how to ask questions in a way that doesn’t sound threatening, but instead builds trust. Let’s look at some of the vocabulary we’re using now to interact with teachers and how, through word substitution, we can reshape those conversations to foster better outcomes.”

Superintendent Rod Thompson's suburban Minnesota district has grown from 3,500 students to 8,000.

In the past 15 years, the Shakopee School District, in a suburb of Minneapolis-St. Paul, has grown from 3,500 students to 8,000. The district is averaging 300 new students and 50-60 new teachers per year. We spoke with Superintendent Rod Thompson, who attended the San Antonio District Administration Leadership Institute Summit in November, about the challenges and opportunities of continued growth.

The Kent School District in Washington has more diversity in its student body, greater achievement and better technology, in major part due to Superintendent Edward Lee Vargas.

Every day, students whose families speak among 138 different languages learn together in the classrooms at Kent School District in Washington. To address the linguistic and economic challenges for the 27,000 K12 students—the majority of whom receive free or reduced price lunch—administrators have worked hard to build innovative language and technology programs.

New Irving ISD Superintendent Jose Parra previously led the much smaller Lockhart ISD in Texas

Jose Parra became superintendent of Irving ISD in Texas in December. Parra was superintendent of the 5,000-student Lockhart ISD, where he helped raise test scores and graduation rates. He aims to continue his efforts in Irving, which has 35,000 students—that’s seven times the size of Lockhart.

Stephen Falcone resigned as superintendent of Darien Public Schools in Connecticut after the district was found to have violated special education laws. (Megan L. Spicer/Darien News)

Superintendent resigns

Stephen Falcone, superintendent of Darien Public Schools in Connecticut, resigned in October after a state Department of Education report found the district violated special education laws on multiple occasions during the 2012-2013 school year.

School district leaders must ignore the politics of Common Core and focus on the practical realities of implementation.

As widespread adoption of the Common Core State Standards moves ever closer, the initiative is coming under attack from both the left and right. But school district leaders must ignore the politics and focus on the practical realities of implementation: costs, technology, and training, K12 leaders say.

Superintendent Joe Kitchens from Western Heights Schools has made technology the priority throughout his career.

Superintendent Joe Kitchens thinks technology will keep students in school and on track to graduate. The 20-year-leader of the Western Heights school district in suburban Oklahoma City is focusing on a strong telecommunications network and analyzing student data through various platforms to raise the 63 percent graduation rate.

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