You are here


ClassFlow by Promethean facilitates engagement and inquiry-based learning in Maryland district

Harford County Public Schools (HCPS) in Maryland was challenged to increase student engagement and to use technology to facilitate learning. The DigitalHARFORD initiative was established two years ago to help infuse the right digital tools and content into newly created active learning environments to inspire all students in the district’s 54 schools. To fulfill that mission, the appropriate solutions had to be chosen and implemented successfully.


While administrators have more student information available to them than ever before, the challenge is to use this data effectively and strategically to ensure that students are learning and achieving at high levels, and district resources are allocated efficiently.

Attend this web seminar to learn how two administrators transformed their districts by using data from their student information systems more effectively to improve instruction and create measurable gains, while also improving efficiency and communication between staff, students and parents.


When administrators consider implementing blended learning, they tend to start with technology, evaluating what they have or what they need. But what happens after the technology—the operational side of things—is what can really make or break a blended learning initiative. How do you plan for instruction? Have you prepared your teachers? Where does content come from?


Attend this web seminar to learn how to empower students by giving them time to drive their own learning. Educator Kevin Brookhouser will focus on the simple concept of 20Time: giving students one day a week to work on a project of their choosing—one that serves a real audience and solves a real-world problem.


The need for a secure and protected digital learning environment in districts is paramount, but online testing raises serious security concerns. While conducting large-scale online testing requires advanced coordination that is both time consuming and complex, using iPads can save time and simplify the process, so teachers, students, and administrators can focus on teaching and learning, and being better prepared for online exams.


Using technology effectively at the early elementary level has the potential to improve achievement across grade levels in a district, by preparing elementary students to use the digital tools they will use later on in school, and in college and career.


It’s crucial for today’s students to develop foundational technology skills that can be applied to their core subject learning. To accomplish this goal, districts need to coordinate the efforts of technology and academic staff to embed digital learning into curriculum.

An elementary school technician from York School District in Maine helps students record a weekly news broadcast —a job not often assumed by a support technician in the past.

Student-centered CIOs must now focus more on the user experience than on just keeping networks and machines functioning.

“To be successful you have to dedicate 80 percent of your resources toward the service side of IT, and 20 percent to keeping the boxes working,” says Jason Saltmarsh, an education technology consultant and former district technology director. In the past, before students were in charge of their own devices, the opposite was true.

R.J. Gravel (@rjgravel) is the director of instructional technology for Johnsburg School District 12, in Johnsburg, IL.

As more school leaders adopt cloud-based technology to support educator and student achievement, the need for efficient processes to run student and teacher accounts increases.

In the past, printed instructional materials would be received, sorted, labeled and distributed to classrooms. Materials traveled from the office to the teacher, then from the educator to the student. But for cloud-based materials, the distribution process looks quite different.

After two decades implementing technology in schools, one thing that’s become crystal clear is that there’s no single correct model for one-to-one initiatives. And the reality is, the initiatives that fail to meet their desired outcomes weren’t clearly defined from the start. Unless, of course, the objective is merely to put technology in the hands of students and hope that they will figure it out from there – which is a typical case of a solution looking for a problem.