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Phil Steitz

Technology should be one part of an overall blended solution that includes insights from educators and curriculum designers

“NMC Horizon Report 2015 K-12 Edition” aims each year to identify the leading trends in technology and education for the next half-decade.

Students in coming years will create their own educational content, 3D printing will become mainstream, and wearable technology will put more demand on school Wi-Fi networks, according to a study released in June by the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN).

At the Challenge to Excellence Charter School (C2E) in Parker, Colorado, educators are using tablets and Google tools in surprising ways to foster creativity, collaboration and content creation in grades K-3, while also establishing a foundation of knowledge-seeking skills that students will use in later grades. In this web seminar, educators from C2E discussed how the school is using Android tabletswith Google Play for Education both inside and outside the classroom for research, projects, field trips and more, how these tools have helped students take ownership of their learning, and the keys to a successful implementation at any school or district.

In this web seminar, originally broadcast on April 14, 2015, educator Kevin Brookhouser discussed ways to empower students by providing them time to drive their own learning, using the simple concept of 20Time: giving students one day a week to work on a project of their choosing—one that serves a real audience and solves a real-world problem. Inspired by author Daniel Pink and Google’s “20 percent time”—a practice that allows employees to take time out of their “day job” to work on a side passion project—Brookhouser created his own version and applied it to the classroom.


Attend this web seminar to learn how to empower students by giving them time to drive their own learning. Educator Kevin Brookhouser will focus on the simple concept of 20Time: giving students one day a week to work on a project of their choosing—one that serves a real audience and solves a real-world problem.

Instructional technology can enhance the classroom experience by delivering personalized learning to students on a greater level. Forsyth County Schools in Georgia successfully implemented digital learning content and tools that drive higher order thinking and increase student engagement.

In 2011, Council Bluffs Community Schools in Iowa was one of the first districts to implement 1-to-1 with Google Chromebooks for its students in grades 6-12. Results have included improved student achievement, rising graduation rates and decreasing dropout rates. This web seminar, originally presented on April 29, 2014, featured an administrator from Council Bluffs, who shared why the district went with Google tools, the impact of 1-to-1 on educators and students, and the major decisions that need to be made before any 1-to-1 initiative.

Google Chromebooks and Google Apps for Education provide districts with cloud-based tools that are easy to implement and manage, that are affordable and reliable, and that enable student collaboration, communication and content creation from anywhere, on any device, at any time. In the fall of 2014, Google will introduce Classroom, a new free tool in Google Apps for Education. Classroom weaves together Google Docs, Drive and Gmail to help teachers create and organize assignments quickly, provide feedback efficiently, and communicate with their classes with ease.

One of the key struggles in implementing most 1-to-1 programs is figuring out how to manage device deployments with limited staffing. However, a comprehensive enterprise-grade support system like Sprint’s Wireless Campus Manager can help districts with device management support efforts such as asset staging, asset tagging and tracking, and remote control of the device.

Students will need creativity, critical thinking, communication and problem-solving skills to succeed in college and future careers. To facilitate those skills, teachers need effective professional development to best use and integrate technology in the classroom. This web seminar, originally broadcast on June 5, 2014, featured an administrator from Richland School District Two, who shared expertise on how she helped launch a 27,000-student 1-to-1 program with Google Chromebooks and Apps for Education with the goal of improving student learning.