You are here



The changing landscape of K12 education in the 21st century has transformed the role of the school principal. Today the expanded leadership responsibilities of principals have made them more crucial than ever to the success of a school district.


As the job of leading a district becomes ever more complex, and with many school systems facing large numbers of retirements, succession planning is becoming ever more important. Proactive succession planning for key leadership positions minimizes the costs, upheaval, instability and disruption of long term district goals and initiatives due to leadership turnover.

In the Charlotte-Mecklenberg Schools, administrators have developed a leadership pipeline and succession plan that are helping the eighteenth-largest school system in the country achieve long-term success.

With this web-based platform, teachers can bring a variety of industry professionals, from a chef to a scientist, into the classroom to speak to students. Teachers make requests through Nepris, which automatically matches the skills of professionals to curriculum topic and other activities.


These real-world videos highlight jobs from different industries so students can connect educational concepts to college and careers. The videos depict how workers use math, language arts, science and technology. A diverse group of workers with varying educational backgrounds is interviewed to show students the skills they need to achieve their goals.

Clinton Community School District Superintendent Deborah A. Olson

Iowa’s Clinton Community School District has incorporated two cutting-edge programs into its learning environment in hopes of giving students a better chance at graduating and succeeding in college or career.

Anoka-Hennepin district students in the seventh-grade technology education class.

In suburban Minneapolis, seventh graders will soon start building skills for local technical jobs that may be open to them when they finish school.

Most students who took the ACT risk falling behind in college and lack the skills necessary to join the modern workforce, according to a report from the company that offers the test. Meanwhile, 31 percent of students tested did not meet any of the assessment’s college benchmarks, which the report says demonstrates the need for a more rigorous curriculum in U.S. schools.

Since 2004, overall interest in STEM majors and careers among high school seniors has increased by more than 20 percent, according to a new report from STEMconnector, an online STEM news source. And the southern states of the U.S. have the highest concentration of students interested in STEM, at 36 percent, compared to other regions.

Released in February, the “Where are the STEM Students?” report revealed that mechanical engineering was the most popular major or career choice among STEM-interested students, at 20 percent, while biology was second at 12 percent.

Students from a NAF Academy of Engineering in San Francisco gain internship experience on construction sites of major transit projects.

A new assessment system for high school students providing multiple measures of college and career readiness launched this fall, helping students in career-themed public high schools understand what skills they need to enter the 21st-century workforce. The National Academy Foundation (NAF), the largest developer of career-themed public high schools in the country, partnered with education research agency WestEd to create the multi-method test, marking a move toward more effectively measuring college and career readiness.

Rupert Murdoch

Amplify and AT&T

News Corporation Chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch created an education technology division, led by former New York City schools chancellor Joel Klein. The group, called Amplify, teamed up with AT&T July 23 to deliver digital content through 4G tablets.