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Table of Contents

Mar 2002

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Cover Story


Groundwork for the recently approved education bill started simply enough. Educators, business people, parents, and community leaders in Hamilton, Ohio, met last March.

Superintendent Ann Moore didn't think she was doing anything wrong. Her Huntsville (Ala.) City School District needed $9.6 million more per year to maintain a variety of enrichment programs, including one for gifted students. She opted to appeal directly to the taxpayers, the ultimate arbitrators.

A universal truth in the life of a teacher or administrator is that there are never enough hours in the day, days in the week and weeks in the year. And professional development is especially hard to squeeze onto a filled calendar.


His resume is 19 pages. He has written numerous books and won many awards. And he's leading one of the nation's most diverse school districts.

His name is Jerry Weast, hired in the summer of 1999 to lead Montgomery County Public Schools in Maryland, and as you might have guessed, he has a plan for improvement.

For discriminating parents like Susan Rutledge, there are more than 80 private and parochial schools to choose from in and around her home of Pearl River, N.Y., just some 20 miles from New York City.

"There is a lot of competition," admits Pearl River Public Schools Superintendent Richard Maurer.


Bush Promises Extra Funding for Reading First

In the new education bill, reading and literacy funding will rise by 11 percent. These funds will be spent in a new program called Reading First. For 2002, the program's inaugural year, Congress allocated $900 million to this program.

President George Bush and U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige will push for a federal investment of $1 billion in next year's education budget.


By now, most readers probably know the story of Christine Pelton, a high school science teacher in Piper, Kan. If not, here's a quick recap.

Top 25 Criticism

This morning we received our copy of DISTRICT ADMINISTRATION. I immediately turned to the cover story ("The Top 25 Education Technology Advocates," December 2001, p. 33) and found myself utterly astonished by your choices for the list, which failed to include Jamie McKenzie.

Cosmic Reading Journey

Sunburst Communications Inc., 800-338-3457, Grades: 2-3 Teaches: Reading comprehension, parts of speech, vocabulary, spelling Platform: Win, Mac $89.95